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To promote the conservation, sound management, and sustainable use of Indiana's wildlife and wildlife habitat through education, advocacy, and action.

1990's Resolutions

Resolution No. 90-11

JIM LAHEY

WHEREAS, Jim Lahey served as chairman of the Bureau of Land, Forest and Wildlife Advisory Council for fourteen years; and

WHEREAS, Jim Lahey served as chairman of the Natural Resources Commission for eleven years; and

WHEREAS, Jim Lahey has provided steadfast support and leadership during these years in the fields of professional resource management, reclamation, flood control, and wetland protection; and

WHEREAS, Jim Lahey is retiring from the Commission after twenty-five years of dedicated service;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana extends to Chairman Jim Lahey our deep-felt appreciation and thanks for the twenty-five years of dedicated service and leadership in the wise use and conservation of Indiana's natural resources,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that this resolution be presented to Chairman Lahey at the June 1990 meeting of the Natural Resources Commission. Back

Resolution No. 90-10

ANIMAL "RIGHTS" ACTIVISTS

WHEREAS, it has been a tradition since the beginning of time for men, women and children to take animals for food and clothing; and

WHEREAS, since modern times it has been lawful for men, women and children to pursue certain animals under strict set aside provisions and under regulated game laws; and

WHEREAS, certain animals, such as the white-tail deer in Indiana are in abundance and need to be kept under control by lawful means; and

WHEREAS, some businesses use animals for food, fertilizers, medical research and clothing; and

WHEREAS, other businesses use animals for education and zoo entertainment for children and adults; and

WHEREAS, animal "rights" activists have openly proclaimed that intimidation by arson, property destruction, burglary, theft, and threats are acceptable crimes when dealt with civil protest as a means to promote the interest of animals; and

WHEREAS, animal "rights" activists have claimed responsibility for over ten million dollars of damage to laboratories of medical research in the United States; and

WHEREAS, hundreds of Hoosiers and thousands of tax-paying citizens throughout the United States will lose their jobs if businesses fail or are forced to close because of continued vandalism, harassment, and intimidation to their customers by pro-animal protestors;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana urges the Indiana General Assembly and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources to enact legislation that will combat those who use intimidation, terrorism by violence or other means toward any individual, business or industry that deals with animals; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation opposes any individual or group of activists who would force Hoosiers and U.S. taxpayers to lose their jobs due to business or industry shutdown because of violent tactics and intimidation; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation supports the continued funding by the United States Congress and other interested organizations of medical research and testing which use animals responsibly. Back

Resolution No. 90-9

PUBLIC FRESHWATER LAKES

WHEREAS, the State of Indiana has been blessed with hundreds of public freshwater lakes which provide fish and wildlife habitat and many opportunities for outdoor recreation; and

WHEREAS, these public freshwater lakes also provide an important economic base for local communities, as well as the State in general; and

WHEREAS, it has been determined that a significant number of our lakes are being threatened or impaired by various sources of pollution, especially non-point; and

WHEREAS, there are a number of existing state and federal laws and programs available for the protection and management of our lakes; and

WHEREAS, the responsibilities for administering the laws and programs are split between the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and the Indiana Department of Environmental Management; and

WHEREAS, this division of responsibilities has led to confusion among the public, inadequate implementation and enforcement of laws AND a major loss this year of available federal 319 non-point pollution control funds,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana requests Governor Bayh, by Executive Order, to 1) consolidate all responsibilities, programs and budgets dealing with lake management and protection, including non-point pollution control, and (2) to designate the Indiana Department of Natural Resources as the administering agency for state government.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Bayh administration seek full funding for the T x 2000 Lake Enhancement programs during the 1991 session of the General Assembly. Back

Resolution No. 90-8

RECYCLING

WHEREAS, we are generating more waste than ever before at an alarming rate, and

WHEREAS, our existing landfills are nearing capacity; and

WHEREAS, citing new, necessary facilities for waste disposal is becoming more difficult; and

WHEREAS, the most prevalent items in our landfills are paper products, most of which can be recycled; and

WHEREAS, there are communities where recycling centers, curbside sorting and industrial sorting do significantly reduce the amount of waste hauled to landfills, thus prolonging the life of the facility;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana urges and supports action by all Indiana residents, businesses and industries to recycle waste, to sort items, to demand pick-up of pre-sorted material and to insist on recycling and using recycled products in county and municipal offices and agencies and to insist on recycling/sorting centers in all Hoosier communities. Back

Resolution No. 90-7

COOPERATION WITH AGRICULTURAL INTERESTS

WHEREAS, the mining and agricultural industries are the two largest in the world; and

WHEREAS, both areas significantly affect the natural resources of our country and our state; and

WHEREAS, many of our nation's farmers are deeply concerned for the welfare of our natural resources; and

WHEREAS, communication between the agricultural community and the natural resources communities has not always been ideal; and

WHEREAS, the benefits to our natural resources would be immense if there was better coordination, cooperation and communication between the two;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana urges its members and affiliate organizations and members of all natural resource related organizations in Indiana to continue to reach out to leaders in the agricultural arena to seek their views, to build their trust in the natural resources community, and to work together on environmental issues of mutual concern. Back

Resolution No. 90-6

1990 FARM BILL

WHEREAS, the Soil Conservation Service has a long tradition of consultation and aid in implementing soil saving practices on U.S. farmland; and

WHEREAS, much of the work of the Soil Conservation Service has not been as a regulatory or enforcement agency; and

WHEREAS, the "Swampbuster" provisions of the Food Security Act, also called the "Farm Bill" need enforcement to protect our dwindling wetlands; and

WHEREAS, placing the Soil Conservation Service personnel in a regulatory position may create unfavorable working conditions with the clientele they serve which could result in a drop in the number of requests for service critical to our nation's soil resources; and

WHEREAS, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has operated as a regulatory agency and could complement the work of SCS in protecting soil resources by protecting wetlands; and

WHEREAS, wetlands are still being lost in rural areas because there are still many opportunities to alter wetlands in ways that currently do not violate swampbuster provisions; and

WHEREAS, many decisions to permit wetland alteration cannot be appealed by all those who may be affected;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana supports the recommendations for the "Swambsuter" provisions of the 1990 Farm Bill and urges our U.S. Congressmen and women to do the same: (1) that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service administer and enforce the "Swampbuster" provisions; (2) that any alteration of a wetland be considered a violation; (3) that all affected publics have the right to appeal decisions regarding alteration of a wetland. Back

Resolution No. 90-5

FACILITIES AT INDIANA DUNES STATE PARK

WHEREAS, some of Indiana's state parks have inns that provide reasonable, modern accommodations within park boundaries; and

WHEREAS, in all cases, those inns were established many years ago when there was no nearby towns or towns with accommodations; and

WHEREAS, the natural terrain of the Indiana Dunes State Park with its dunes and marshes is unique and fragile, and the necessary disturbance that comes with further development poses a threat to the natural features of the park; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Dunes State Park is surrounded by metropolitan areas with overnight accommodations or with at least the potential for hotel/motel development; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Dunes State Park already does provide 458 campsites of various types for those who want to stay overnight in the park.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana urges the Director of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and the Indiana Natural Resources Commission to prohibit location of any hotel/motel within the boundaries of the Indiana Dunes State Park. Back

Regulation No. 90-4

CONSERVATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

WHEREAS, the "three R's" of readin' 'ritin' and 'rithmetic have never been disputed as essential in the education of our children; and

WHEREAS, there is a growing desire to add a fourth "R" in "resources" to our schools' curriculum; and

WHEREAS, most of the natural resources and environmental education is being done by and promoted in our schools through divisions within the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and through private organizations; and

WHEREAS, wise and informed, environmentally sound lifestyle decisions are made based on the knowledge, skills and commitment gained from effective instructional programs provided at all levels of our educational system; and

WHEREAS, it is widely accepted that "teachers teach what they have been taught;" and

WHEREAS, a teaching license in Indiana does not require the candidate to have credits in environmental education or natural resource classes;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana urges the Governor, the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Indiana Department of Education to actively promote the integration of environmental education into the elementary and secondary schools in Indiana; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation encourages the establishment of a requirement for credit in environmental education or natural resources for all teaching license candidates in Indiana. Back

Resolution No. 90-2

OUT-OF-STATE DUMPING IN INDIANA

WHEREAS, Indiana's landfills are quickly reaching their capacity; and

WHEREAS, Indiana residents face substantial problems in disposal of their own waste; and

WHEREAS, it has been financially attractive for out-of-state waste haulers to dump in Indiana landfills; and

WHEREAS, Governor Bayh has signed an Executive Order limiting the kind of amount of out-of-state waste hauled into Indiana and dumped in the landfills; and

WHEREAS, the Governor's Executive Order also eliminates the financial incentives to dump in Indiana by raising fees; and

WHEREAS, the Governor's Executive Order is being challenged in court by out-of-state waste haulers;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park fully supports Governor Bayh's Executive Order restricting the dumping out-of-state waste in Indiana landfills; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation also supports the Governor's efforts to have all out-of-state waste labeled, ie identified. Back

Resolution No. 90-1

LAKE MICHIGAN SPORT FISH

WHEREAS, many of the charter boat captains have voiced disapproval with the conclusions of the National Wildlife Federation's publication, "Lake Michigan Sport Fish, Should You Eat Your Catch;" and

WHEREAS, the publication is an evaluation of contaminant concentration data for Lake Michigan fish from information provided by the natural resource agencies for the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation (IWF) encourages efforts which will contribute to a better informed public; and

WHEREAS, the IWF sympathizes with those who are affected, financially or otherwise, by toxics in the waters; and

WHEREAS, the only lasting solution is for all parties to unite and demand that the Great Lakes be cleaned;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 9-10, 1990 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana reaffirms its support of the findings of the National Wildlife Federation's publication, "Lake Michigan Sport Fish, Should You Eat Your Catch;" and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges all parties to unite and demand that the Great Lakes be cleaned of its contamination. Back

Resolution No. 91-4

SUPPORT FOR HB 251 PROTECTING OUR NATION'S WETLANDS

WHEREAS, the value of our nation's wetlands has been proven; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation has repeatedly supported the protection of Indiana's wetlands as well as those of the nation; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation has also encouraged education of and cooperation with those groups and individuals whose evaluation of our nation's wetlands were not consistent with ours; and

WHEREAS, there is currently a massive effort by realtor, land developers, land owners, and the timber industry to deluge Congress with pleas to ignore the minimal protection of wetlands provided through the Swampbuster provisions of the Farm Bill and through Section 404 of the Clean Water Act; and

WHEREAS, Section 404 is the only regulatory law that provides any protection for wetlands; and

WHEREAS, the current law is being attacked in order to weaken it; and

WHEREAS, the following bills; HR 1330, HR 404, and HR 2400 are being proposed to weaken Section 404; and

WHEREAS, HR 251 proposes to strengthen Section 404 of the Clean Water Act; and

WHEREAS, support for HR 251 is support for the protection of valuable wildlife habitat as well as all the other benefits provided by wetlands;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in Annual Meeting June 8-9, 1991 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana, strongly urges all members of the Indiana Congressional Delegation to support HR 251 in protecting our valuable wetlands; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the members of the Indiana Wildlife Federation individually write or call the members of the Indiana Congressional Delegation to oppose HR 1330, HR 404 and HR 2400 and urge support for HR 251. Back

Resolution No. 91-3

DIVERSION OF WATERS FROM THE GREAT LAKES BASIN

WHEREAS, the waters of the Great Lakes are significant as sources of fishing, outdoor recreation, major surface transportation and hydroelectric power; and

WHEREAS, the demands for water in the Great Lakes Basin for agriculture, industry and manufacturing are also significant; and

WHEREAS, all of these benefits affect a large populace and the economy of the entire nation; and

WHEREAS, the groundwater in Lowell, Indiana is contaminated with fluoride; and

WHEREAS, the City of Lowell, Indiana is proposing to divert 3.8 million gallons of water per day (mgd) from Lake Michigan; and

WHEREAS, Lowell currently uses less than one mgd.; and

WHEREAS, the water proposed for diversion would be discharged after use into the Kankakee River which is outside the Great Lakes Basin; and

WHEREAS, a similar situation exists at Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, where 3.2 mgd is diverted in a temporary situation, and the treated water is returned after use to Lake Michigan; and

WHEREAS, the drinking water quality for Lowell residents is a serious issue to be addressed, but the proposed permanent diversion exceeds current needs because the excess is slated for "future growth" in the area; and

WHEREAS, there are other options for safe drinking water for Lowell besides diversion of Great Lakes waters; and

WHEREAS, the level of the Great Lakes is subject to significant natural fluctuations which may be affected by diversion of water with detrimental and unpredictable ecological consequences; and

WHEREAS, permanent diversions may lead to such detrimental consequences as loss of coastal wetlands, fish spawning areas and beachfront with increased needs for deeper channel dredging; and

WHEREAS, U.S. Public Law 99-662, Section 1109 states that diversion of any water from the Great Lakes Basin is prohibited unless approved by the Governor of each of the Great Lakes states;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in Annual Meeting June 8-9, 1991 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana, opposes any plan to divert water from the Great Lakes Basin for any purpose; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Governor Bayh also opposes such diversion. Back

Resolution No. 91-2

IMMEDIATE ADOPTION OF 1991 STATE BUDGET

WHEREAS, state funded programs include a number of projects involving management of Indiana's natural resources; and

WHEREAS, natural cycles respond to environmental conditions, not budgetary arguments; and

WHEREAS, it is the responsibility and the duty of elected officials in Indiana to produce and approve a budget that includes the funding of natural resources management; and

WHEREAS, the current administration and legislature are still unwilling or unable to agree on a budget for state funds; and

WHEREAS, this inability to perform a major function for which they were elected seriously jeopardizes essential, current and planned programs affecting our Indiana wildlife and wildlife habitat;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in Annual Meeting June 8-9, 1991 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana, encourages all IWF members to contact their respective legislators to set partisan politics aside and adopt a state budget that does not penalize natural resource management in Indiana. Back

Resolution No. 91-1

REGULATING THE TAKING OF NONGAME WILDLIFE SPECIES

WHEREAS, protection is currently lacking for non-threatened or non-endangered nongame wildlife; and

WHEREAS, there is ample evidence that these species are being exploited for the pet, leather (snake skins) and scientific supply industries; and

WHEREAS, it is difficult to determine the extent of commercial trade of these species; and

WHEREAS, no permits are required or statistics kept on this type of commerce; and

WHEREAS, several Midwest states have restricted commercialization of nongame species; and

WHEREAS, others are in the process of doing so; and

WHEREAS, as the other sources are eliminated Indiana's nongame wildlife faces increasing pressure; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, nongame Unit and Enforcement Division is working on regulations for the taking of nongame wildlife that must be fair, reasonable, and enforceable;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in Annual Meeting June 8-9, 1991 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana urges the adoption of administrative rules to regulate the taking of nongame species of wild animals with particular consideration concerning commercial purposes; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the agency is requested to hold at least three (3) hearings; south, central and north, for taking public comments on the proposed regulations. Back

Resolution No. 92-8

ZEBRA MUSSELS

WHEREAS, Zebra mussels are small mollusks that can grow to 1.5 to 2 inches when adult and resemble marine mussels; and

WHEREAS, the Zebra mussel, a native of Europe, found its way into The Great Lakes in 1988, through the Great Lakes Seaway; and

WHEREAS, the Zebra Mussel, since 1988, has been discovered through many inland lakes through The Great Lakes basin area, including Lake Wawasee; and

WHEREAS, Zebra Mussels can populate quickly in small areas and have been found to exceed numbers over 9000 in a square foot; and

WHEREAS, these clusters in municipal water intake pipes can greatly reduce the flow of water to municipalities; and

WHEREAS, biologically, little is known specifically about the effects of Zebra Mussels on fish and humans; and

WHEREAS, Zebra mussels can be quickly spread by watercraft moving from infected waters to non-infected waters by clinging unto intake areas and propellers.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled at annual meeting June 13-14, 1992 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges the Indiana General Assembly to appoint an agency to study the biological effects of Zebra Mussels on fish, wildlife and aquatic resources; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that sufficient funding be established to conduct such a study; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation supports the measures taken by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources' Division of Fish and Wildlife for the control of Zebra Mussels and will further help to educate the public. Back

Resolution No. 92-7

AIR POLLUTION IN INDIANA

WHEREAS, Indiana ranks second in the nation in chemical releases at 33 million pounds annually known to cause cancer; and

WHEREAS, Indiana ranks fourth in chemical releases linked to birth defects and

WHEREAS, Indiana companies released a total of 265.2 million pounds of toxic chemicals into the air, land, and water in 1989, according to records compiled by the U.S. EPA and released in 1991; and

WHEREAS, these figures show little if no improvement since 1987, when NWF first published the "Toxic 500",

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled at annual meeting June 13-14, 1992 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges Indiana companies and the U.S. EPA to take prompt action to rectify these toxic chemicals released; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the proper action be taken to keep all industries, nationwide, in compliance with air quality standards that have been set by the U.S. EPA. Back

Resolution No. 92-6

SUPPORT FOR REAUTHORIZATION OF CLEAN WATER ACT

WHEREAS, Indiana and the nation's water resources are continually under attack by developers; and

WHEREAS, wetlands have proven to be beneficial to clean water; and

WHEREAS, groundwater contamination is increasingly becoming a major national problem; and

WHEREAS, pollution from runoff, both point and non-point is degrading our nation's water; and

WHEREAS, the cost of efforts to clean the polluted water are sky rocketing annually; and

WHEREAS, dilution methods have proven to be ineffective; and

WHEREAS, toxics and pesticides released in our waterways build up in the food chain of fish and wildlife.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled at annual meeting June 13-14, 1992 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges the Indiana General Assembly to pass stronger laws relating to our State's Water Resources; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges Congress to reauthorize The Clean Water Act with more stringent amendments, especially section 401 clarifying the state's authority to protect state water quality standards; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges Congress and the EPA to take steps to maintain the physical and biological integrity of each state's waterways; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that action be taken to incorporate a zero discharge mandate into The Clean Water Act by eliminating the use of dilution and by prohibiting discharges of the most harmful toxic pollutants. Back

Resolution No. 92-5

WELANDS DELINEATION MANUAL

WHEREAS, The Clean Water Act (CWA) was created for the purpose of restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Water of the United States; and

WHEREAS, wetlands provide ecological, social, recreation, and economic value with functions including fish and wildlife production, water quality improvement, flood control and ground water recharge; and

WHEREAS, the lower 48 states have suffered losses of over half its wetlands the past 200 years; and

WHEREAS, these wetland losses continue today at a rate of 300,000 acres per year; and

WHEREAS, federal permits granted to drain and fill wetlands destroy valuable fish and wildlife habitat, diminish natural flood control capacity in watersheds, and reduce the ability of wetlands to filter out sediments and pollutants, thereby reducing water quality; and

WHEREAS, Section 404 of The Clean Water Act is the only federal program that provides regulatory protection for wetlands and prohibits the discharge of dredged or fill material into the waters of the United States including wetlands, unless a permit is obtained through section 404; and

WHEREAS, ground water pollution has increasingly become a major national problem; and

WHEREAS, runoff pollutants such as pesticides, toxics, nutrients and sediments are degrading the nation's water systems; and

WHEREAS, water conservation measures benefit al the people, including local governments, the environment and fish and wildlife; and

WHEREAS, the Bush administration has proposed damaging revisions to the 1989 wetland manual that would exclude many acres of wetlands from regulation of Section 404 of The Clean Water Act.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 13-14, 1992 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges that the proposed wetland delineation manual by the Bush administration not be adopted; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Congress follow the recommendation of The National Wildlife Federation and appoint an independent body, such as the National Academy of Sciences, to be commissioned to conduct a study to develop a scientific definition of wetlands delineation methodology that considers regional approaches to wetland delineation; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that during the reauthorization of The Clean Water Act Congress takes action to eliminate all loopholes and strengthen Section 404; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that special attention be given to Section 404, concerning the draining of wetlands so as not to allow this damaging destruction. Back

Resolution No. 92-4

REAUTHORIZATION OF ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT

WHEREAS, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has served as an important piece of legislation in saving species such as the majestic bald eagle and the graceful gray whale from the brink of extinction; and

WHEREAS, the Endangered Species Act is up for reauthorization in 1992, and whereas, opponents of the Endangered Species Act, include real estate developers, the timber industry and the Farm Bureau are establishing well-funded campaigns trying to weaken and destroy The Act; and

WHEREAS, Representative Gerry Studds (D-MA) has taken steps to reauthorize the (ESA) and add strengthening amendments to a bill introduced as H.R. 4045; and

WHEREAS, the strengthening amendments would:

1. Give federal officials a deadline to develop and implement recovery plans for ecosystems containing threatened, endangered and candidate species.

2. Encourage officials to develop conservation plans for whole ecosystems instead of single species.

3. Expand citizen's right to file law-suits against violators of The Endangered Species Act in emergency situations. By allowing Citizens to file suit immediately if an endangered species faces serious harm or extinction;

4. Increase funding levels for chronically underfunded federal Endangered Programs; and

5. Initiate a revolving fund to help communities create plans to balance local development needs with habitat Protection for Endangered Species; and

WHEREAS, The National Wildlife Federation and its affiliates including the Indiana Wildlife Federation and their affiliates have chosen for their 1992 National Wildlife Week Theme "Endangered Species", a top priority for the year 1992;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 13-14, 1992 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges the Indiana delegation along with Senator Richard Lugar and Senator Dan Coats to support passage of the Endangered Species Act with the attached amendments to strengthen the ESA; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Governor Evan Bayh also support the ESA with the same strengthening amendments. Back

Resolution No. 92-3

SUPPORT GREAT LAKES WATER QUALITY INITIATIVE

WHEREAS, The Great Lakes contain 20% of the world fresh water supply; and

WHEREAS, many people throughout the United States and Canada eat fish as a food source from these waters; and

WHEREAS, many people who live within the Great Lakes boundaries depend on this food source for their source of food consumption; and

WHEREAS, many families and individuals have throughout generations learned to depend on this food source as a sole source of income to support their families; and

WHEREAS, people both from outside and within these boundaries spend countless hours of recreation on the Great Lakes each year and therefore these same people spend billions of dollars to enjoy their recreation; and

WHEREAS, the fishing industries and the individuals that support these industries also spend billions of dollars each year which goes into the economy; and

WHEREAS, municipalities within these Great Lakes boundaries use these fresh waters as their sole source of public use and drinking water; and

WHEREAS, a draft program called "Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative" has been sent to U.S. EPA administrator, William Rielly, to help set federal water quality guidance has already missed a June 1, 1991 deadline for publishing in the federal register; and

WHEREAS, intense pressure to delay printing the draft by the EPA administration has been put forth both by the polluting industries and from President Bush's re-election campaign strategists; and

WHEREAS, adoption of the "Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative" as a federal guidance would bring all Great Lakes States into compliance accordingly;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting June 13-14, 1992 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges that the U.S. EPA administrator, William Rielly and his administration immediately publish the "Great Lakes Initiative" that has been approved by the Initiative Steering Committee; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the U.S. EPA set guidance as needed to:

1. Set water quality standards to protect wildlife and people from toxic contamination in the food chain.

2. Prohibit polluters from hiding their waste instead of treating it through the dilution and mixing zone methods.

3. Protect high-quality waters by requiring polluters to install pollution prevention technology Before being given discharge permits; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Senator Dan Coats along with the Indiana U.S. Congressional Representatives also encourage the U.S. EPA to adopt the "Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative" by using Governor Evan Bayh's letter to William Rielly as an example. Back

Resolution No. 92-2

PUBLIC ACCESS TO BODIES OF WATER

WHEREAS, one of the most enjoyable recreations across the state is boating; and

WHEREAS, on some reservoirs, which have been built with public funds by Public Utilities, certain private marinas have had a tendency to raise ramp fees 2 ½ to 3 fold on weekends; and

WHEREAS, these marina operators have stated that they are increasing their fees for safety sake; and

WHEREAS, the amount one can afford should not be a criteria to show how safe one will be; and

WHEREAS, where safety is a problem it is the responsibility of the DNR Law Enforcement Division to remedy, and not the marina operators; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Legislative Natural Resources Study Committee has been asked, again this year, to consider this practice of charging exorbitant fees; and

WHEREAS, the NRSC has also been asked to consider legislation similar to 1992, HB-1304, which would have required that access to a body over which the DNR has jurisdiction be available to all persons for a fee of no more than $2.00 higher than the fee charged by the DNR, where the DNR provides access to bodies of water;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 13-14, 1992 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges the Indiana Legislature to support the introduction and enactment of a bill similar to 1992, House Bill 1304. Back

Resolution No. 92-1

HUNTING PRESERVES

WHEREAS, attempting to stop preserve hunting is one of the first steps the animal activists are using to curb all hunting; and

WHEREAS, hunting preserves have been lawful for many years in Indiana; and

WHEREAS, an Indiana Department of Natural Resources permit is required for such an operation; and

WHEREAS, some hunting preserves are offering both native and non-native game birds to their clients; and

WHEREAS, some hunting preserves have branched out to include exotic non-native animals; and

WHEREAS, there is concern that these exotic animals may be carriers of diseases which could be harmful to native wildlife; and

WHEREAS, the state of Indiana already allows the importation of non-native wildlife, such as trout, as long as the wildlife is accompanied by a certified disease free certificate; and

WHEREAS, some individuals feel that this type of hunting is not sporting; and

WHEREAS, others consider using a hunting preserve as a matter of personal preference; and

WHEREAS, some preserves have even illegally offered endangered and threatened species of wildlife; and

WHEREAS, on some preserves the wildlife is allowed to be shot within a few feet of the release point; and

WHEREAS, Indiana has no laws governing exotic animals and the hunting of them; and

WHEREAS, a Dekalb County Judge has ruled that the Indiana Department of Natural Resources already has the power to control preserve hunting;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 13-14, 1992 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges the Indiana Department of Natural Resources to prepare a plan to submit to the Legislative Natural Resources Study Committee, this year, that would set rules and regulations concerning the operation of and prevention of infectious diseases on hunting preserves; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that if there is any fiscal impact to the plan that it be shared by both the sportsmen and the general public; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the public's share come from the general fund of the State of Indiana; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that all the animals be treated humanely, and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that only hunting methods which are deemed to be ethical and proper, in normal hunting situation, be used. Back

Resolution No. 93-1

MILITARY FACILITY CLOSURES

WHEREAS, the Department of Defense (DOD) and Congress have announced military facility closures and realignments both domestic and abroad; and

WHEREAS, changes in governmental structures, especially Eastern Europe and Russia, have negated a serious threat to the United States and it's militaries; and

WHEREAS, Indiana will have military facility closures; and

WHEREAS, with these closings excellent opportunities for increasing fish and wildlife habitats arise; and

WHEREAS, outdoor public recreation would also improve such as expanding wildlife education programs, urban greenways and nature trails, outdoor recreation facilities, and fishing and hunting areas and shooting ranges.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting on June 12, 2993 at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana, urges all members in Congress, especially the Indiana delegation, to support the transfer of all public lands determined to be surplus from the closure of U.S. military bases in Indiana to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for public recreation and wildlife habitation; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the disposal agency involved in the disposal process of this Indiana property retain this same property for public use; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources be required to use sound management of these public lands. Back

Resolution No. 03-2

WATER QUALITY IN INDIANA

WHEREAS, the waters of Indiana, its ponds, streams, rivers, lakes, and reservoirs are of major economical, environmental, and recreational importance to the people and wildlife of this state; and

WHEREAS, pollution of these waters from persistent toxic chemicals by industrial users and household users have been found to be detrimental to our society and wildlife; and

WHEREAS, agricultural run-off and inefficient waste water treatment plants have greatly contributed to poor water quality in Indiana; and

WHEREAS, air pollution from smoke stacks of industrial users also contribute to the poor quality of our water;

WHEREAS, many of Indiana's underground water reservoirs have been found to be polluted with contaminates which have filtered down through our waterways; and

WHEREAS, many of these polluted waterways lead to Lake Michigan and contribute to the pollution problems of the Great Lakes; and

WHEREAS, the Great Lakes Natural Resource center along with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, all eight Great Lakes States, environmentalists, and representatives from industries have developed a plan called the "Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative" and "A Great Lakes Guidance" that would delineate pollution control requirements pertaining to all U.S. waters of the Great Lakes.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 12, 1993 at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana, urges the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to adopt the "Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative."

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., urges the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) and the General Assembly to implement as quickly as possible the "Great Lakes Guidance" that:

1. eliminates the discharge of the most dangerous toxic chemicals;

2. phases out mixing zones and other dilution approaches to pollution control by the year 2004;

3. protects people and wildlife from toxics that bio-accumulate in the food chain;

4. protects high quality waters from degradation; and

5. controls toxic pollution from point sources, such as run-off from urban and rural areas, leaking dump sites, contaminated sediments, and atmospheric depositions. Back

Resolution No. 93-3

I.D.N.R. SALARY INCREASES

WHEREAS, Indiana resources, (it's air, soil and minerals, forests, waters and wildlife) are managed by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR); and

WHEREAS, the IDNR is made up of many professional people with various college degrees; and

WHEREAS, experience is often needed to formulate the proper decisions to regulate the state's natural resources;

WHEREAS, Indiana biologists rank last in the nation with a salary nearly $6,000 below the national average; and

WHEREAS, Indiana loses many good professionals to other states (because of below average wages), therefore losing valuable years of experience; and

WHEREAS, many of these professionals have spent thousands of dollars in education just to gain their knowledge of expertise in their respective fields; and

WHEREAS, many of these individuals are now finding that they need government assistance just to support their young families.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 12, 1993 at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana, urges the Indiana General Assembly to appoint a committee to report professional resources managers salary of other states throughout the nation; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the salaries of all IDNR employees meet the national average with regard to education and experience; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana General Assembly for the year 1993 take appropriate measures to find sufficient funds to comply with the new rate increases in the next up coming budget.Back

Resolution No. 93-4

REAUTHORIZATION OF THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT

WHEREAS, The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is one of our nation's most important environmental laws ever written protecting both plant species and animal species; and

WHEREAS, the E.S.A. has been periodically reauthorized in 1978, 1982 and 1988 since it was enacted in 1973; and

WHEREAS, the current authorization of the E.S.A. expired September 30, 1992; and

WHEREAS, the listing of the threatened and endangered species, the critical habitat areas and the recovery plans all play an important part in the reauthorization of the E.S.A.; and

WHEREAS, contrary to claims by E.S.A. opponents that the E.S.A. jeopardizes projects and stops them from completion, only 1% of over 120,000 projects that were consulted with U.S. Fish and Wildlife were found to endanger any species; and

WHEREAS, funding for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Marine Fisheries Service are grossly inadequate to protect the E.S.A.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 12, 1993 at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana, urges the U.S. Congress to reauthorize with stronger amendments the already overdue Endangered Species Act; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that further funding be given to the agencies (U.S. Fish and Wildlife and Natural Marine Fisheries Service) to help enforce the E.S.A.; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Indiana's Senator Richard Lugar and Senator Dan Coats, along with the Congressional Representatives, also support the reauthorization with strengthening amendments to the Endangered Species Act. Back

Resolution No. 93-5

PUBLIC RECREATION LAND EASE CENTRAL INDINAA SPORTSMEN AND WOMEN

WHEREAS, east central Indiana, for the major part, is made up of both rural areas and farming communities; and

WHREAS, the lack of recreational public lands in east central Indiana for sportsmen and women are most evident;

WHEREAS, many sportsmen and sportswomen find it necessary to travel long distances to pursue their favorite sport; and

WHEREAS, often this long distance traveling can cause economic and environmental hardships.

NOW, THERFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 12, 1993, at Clifty Falls Park in Madison, Indiana, urges the Director of Land Acquisition of the Department of Natural Resources to pursue all possibilities of acquiring land in East central Indiana for sportsmen and sportswomen;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Budget Director see to it that funds be appropriated for the purchase of these lands when such lands become available. Back

Resolution No. 93-6

REAUTHORIZATION OF THE CLEAN WATER ACT

WHEREAS, the Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972 by Congress to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of our nation's waters; and

WHEREAS, one of the goals of the Clean Water Act is to keep clean water clean; and

WHEREAS, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established guidelines to prevent high quality water from being degraded, little has been done to promote or employ them; and

WHEREAS, the Clean Water Act of 1972 mandated that the nation's waterways be swimable and fishable by the year 1983; and

WHEREAS, ten years later this goal has not been achieved; and

WHEREAS, due to a short-sighted permitting process, millions of pounds of toxics are still being discharged into our nation's waterways; and

WHEREAS, these toxic pollutants are consumed by fish and through the food chain these contaminated fish eventually affect all kinds of wildlife and humans; and

WHEREAS, the consumption of fish or advisories have been implemented in over 4,000 waterways throughout the United States; and

WHEREAS, wetlands are among the richest sources for all forms of fish and wildlife habitats; and

WHEREAS, wetlands are still vital to humans for controlling flooding and purifying your nation's water; and

WHEREAS, the loss of our nation's wetlands threaten some important U.S. industries, (including over 55 billion dollars to the fishing and hunting industries alone, affecting over 170 million Americans in 1885); and

WHEREAS, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife study in 1990 showed that we have lost 509% of our wetlands in the U.S. since our national was founded, and the U.S. is currently losing wetlands at a rate of 300,000 acres annually; and

WHEREAS, the EPA has documented that many of our nation's wastewater treatment plants are severely under compliance, and that it would cost over 110 billion dollars by the year 2010 to bring them in line with today's existing requirements; and

WHEREAS, water conservation measures and unnecessary inflows to already overburdened treatment plans could achieve these benefits in a cost-efficient manner; and

WHEREAS, the recent drinking water contamination problem in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, this past April of 1993 that brought sickness and discomfort to thousands of citizens, resulting in a ban on drinking all tap water unless sterilized, could possibly happen anywhere in the United States.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 12, 1993, at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana, urges Congress to pass or reauthorize a Clean Water Act with strengthening amendments that will:

1. Keep Clean Waters Clean.

A. Strengthen the public review process for all states on all new pollution sources in high quality waters;

B. Establish and enforce minimum requirements for state outstanding resource water programs;

C. Allow citizens to nominate specific rivers, lakes, or streams and coastal waters as outstanding national resource water.

2. Prevent Food Chain Contamination.

A. Immediately ban the discharge of the most toxic chemicals and set a phase-out schedule for all toxic chemicals.

B. Restrict the quality and concentration of pollutants released into our nation's waters through point source permits;

C. Require the elimination of the use and generation of the most dangerous chemicals.

3. Protect Our Nation's Wetlands.

A. Set a goal of the Clean Water Act by protecting the quantity and quality of the nation's wetland resources and restoring those that have been degraded;

B. Improve and expedite the wetlands permitting program by better funding and better training for wetland delineations;

C. Ensure that all wetlands-destroying activities, including draining, dredging and excavating, are covered by the wetlands permitting process;

D. Base all wetlands delineation on science, not politics.

4. Contain Water Conservation Measures.

A. Enact minimum standards for water conservation for growing water and waste water systems that seek permits to expand under the Clean Water Act;

B. Encourage communities to integrate water conservation measure programs;

C. Make water conservation eligible for funding by state revolving loan funds;

D. Ensure that local waste water treatment changes are sufficient to recover all the cost of the operation, maintenance, and replacement of treatment works. Back

Resolution No. 93-7

SUPPORT FOR NON-GAME FUNDING

WHEREAS, many Hoosiers take an active role in protecting nongame wildlife; and

WHEREAS, endangered, threatened, nongame, and species of special concern are all the responsibility of the Indiana Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program administered by the Division of Fish and Wildlife of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources; and

WHEREAS, citizens of Indiana have become increasingly concerned about the protection and management of the state's nongame and endangered wildlife; and

WHEREAS, with this in mind the state legislature established the Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program in 1973; and

WHEREAS, the legislature then provided funding for the program through a tax check-off on the Indiana state tax form in 1981; and

WHEREAS, public contributions are the sole source of revenue for the program which protects and manages more than 550 nongame and endangered species in Indiana, such as the bald eagle, bobcat, Indiana bat, peregrine falcon, and barn owl; and

WHEREAS, more than 1.6 million Hoosiers received a refund in 1991; and

WHEREAS, only four percent of these taxpayers contributed all or a portion of their refund to the Nongame Wildlife Fund; and

WHEREAS, these Hoosiers contributed a total of $392,146 (a $6.66 average); and

WHEREAS, if every eligible refund participant donated only $1.00 through the tax check-off, donations to the fund would quadruple; and

WHEREAS, there have been attempts in recent years to add other check-offs to the Indiana tax form and at the same time remove the nongame tax check-off;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., in annual meeting assembled on June 12, 1993 at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana, reiterates its total support of the funding of the Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program through the tax check-off on the Indiana state tax form, and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation opposes any attempt to add other check-offs or to delete the Nongame Wildlife check-off from the Indiana tax form; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges anyone who receives a tax fund to contribute all or a portion of their refund to the Nongame Wildlife Fund, and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges anyone not receiving a tax refund to also make contributions to the Nongame Wildlife Fund. Back

Resolution No. 93-8

THE INDIANA PAY PHEASANT PROGRAM

WHEREAS, the Division of Fish & Wildlife (DFW) of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources has stated that its Pay Pheasant Program operates at a below-break-even cost; and

WHEREAS, the DFW has decided to discontinue this program; and

WHEREAS, over the past two years the DFW has asked the waterfowl and deer hunters for assistance in setting seasons and policies; and

WHEREAS, many individuals use the Pay Season to help train their dogs;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting assembled on June 12-13, 1993, at Clifty Falls State Park, Madison, Indiana, urges the Division of Fish & Wildlife to survey the Indiana Pay Pheasant hunters as to whether or not to continue the program at a break even cost; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the IWF suggests the survey be made available to all pheasant hunters hunting the Pay sites during the 1993 Pay Season; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the survey state the estimated fee that will be needed for a two-bird hunt. Back

Resolution No. 94-1

IDNR FISH AND WILDLIFE ADVISORY COUNCIL

WHEREAS, the majority of funds budgeted to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife come from the sporting community of hunters and anglers; and

WHEREAS, many outdoor sportsmen and sportswomen are members of conservation organizations including but not limited to the Indiana Wildlife Federation. The Wild Turkey Federation, Ducks Unlimited, Indiana Deer Hunters Association, The Indiana Bowhunters Association, Northeastern Indiana Trout Association, Pheasants Forever, Michiana Walleye Association, B.A.S.S., Inc. and the Sportmen's Roundtable; and

WHEREAS, more of these individuals and organizations would like to have a greater voice in resource management by the Division of Fish and Wildlife; and

WHEREAS, input from primary users of wildlife resources may be beneficial additions to many good ideas already generated within the department; and

WHEREAS, acceptance of additional input and participation from these groups may result in increased public support for Division of Fish and Wildlife programs;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 11 and 12, 1994 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana, strongly recommends that the IDNR Division of Fish and Wildlife establishes an advisory council to enable greater public participation through representatives of citizens conservation organizations in developing policies and procedures for the management of fish and wildlife resources. Back

Resolution No. 94-2

PUBLIC LAND ACQUISITION

WHEREAS, Indiana is public land poor compared to most states; and

WHEREAS, must of this land is not open to hunting, fishing and trapping;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, in annual meeting June 11 and 12, 1994 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana, supports the establishment, by the Indiana Legislature, of a dedicated, non-transferable annual Land Acquisition Stamp Fund to be used exclusively for the purchase of hunting, fishing and trapping land, and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the I.W.F. urges the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Fish and Wildlife to support the establishment of such a program, and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, any person who hunts, fishes or traps in Indiana, be required to purchase a Land Acquisition Stamp before venturing afield. Back

Resolution No. 94-3

IDNR DIRECTOR APPOINTMENT

WHEREAS, the Director of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources is a politically appointed position responsible for the overall management of Indiana's natural resources; and

WHEREAS, this appointment is made by the Governor during his term of office, and

WHEREAS, the need for a natural resource professional appropriately trained is far more important than political affiliations; and

WHEREAS, others besides the Governor may have more intimate knowledge of natural resources issues; and

WHEREAS, members of the Natural Resources Commission deal with natural resources issues and professional resources managers on a regular basis;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, in annual meeting June 11 and 12, 1994 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana, recommends that future appointment of othe Director of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources be made by the Governor upon the recommendation of the majority of the members of the Natural Resources Commission. Back

Resolution No. 94-4

OUT-OF-STATE WASTE

WHEREAS, the State of Indiana has attempted to enact legislation limiting out-of-state waste imported into Indiana; and

WHEREAS, we commend the Legislature and Governor Bayh for their efforts to limit out-of-state wastes coming to Indiana; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation fully supported the actions of state government to limit waste brought into our state; and

WHEREAS, our law was declared unconstitutional by higher courts based on rules and regulations governing interstate commerce;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 11 and 12, 1994 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana, encourages our United States Representatives and Senators to continue to encourage federal legislation that would be constitutional while allowing Indiana to determine how much and what kind of out-of-state waste is placed in Indiana lawndfills. Back

Resolution 94-5

JEFFERSON PROVING GROUND NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

WHEREAS, the U.S. Department of the Army has declared the Jefferson Proving Group (JPG) to be surplus property; and

WHEREAS, the total acreage amounts to 55,264 acres entirely surrounded by an eight-foot fence; and

WHEREAS, less than 4% of Indiana acres are public lands; and

WHEREAS, the U.S. Army is offering this property to state and federal agencies at no cost; and

WHEREAS, biodiversity conservation is of utmost importance to all conservationists, and the JPG represents one of the most significant opportunities in the Midwest for conservation efforts; and

WHEREAS, the habitat on JPG represents an outstanding opportunity for restoration management of biodiversity for 30,000 acres of mature forests, 19,000 acres of scrub woodland, 6,000 acres of palustrine wetlands, 90 miles of permanent and ephemeral streams and 10 ponds and lakes; and

WHEREAS, through professional surveys, there is documentation of over 100 species of birds, including neotropical species, 50 species of mammal, 59 species of reptiles and 41 species of fish; and

WHEREAS, endangered species are known to be present on JPG, namely the Indiana bat and the bald eagle;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc in annual meeting June 11 and 12, 1994 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana, strongly urges the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the State of Indiana through the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and any other appropriate agencies to promptly establish the Jefferson Proving Grounds as a National Wildlife Refuge where hunting, fishing, and trapping will be allowed. Back

Resolution No. 94-6

CONTROLLED SHOOTING PROGRAMS TO REDUCE DEER IN INDIANA STATE PARKS

WHEREAS, Christine McCreedy, a researcher for the Division of Fish and Wildlife of the Department of Natural Resources, in November and December of 1993 conducted a survey concerning the support for controlled shooting programs to reduce deer populations in state parks; and

WHEREAS, the survey collected data from 1,512 participants concerning the operation of the Fish & Wildlife Division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources; and

WHEREAS, 67% of all the respondents support controlled shooting programs to reduce deer population in state parks; and

WHEREAS, 62% of the non-hunter respondents also indicated support of controlled shooting programs to reduce deer population in state parks; and

WHEREAS, 75% of the hunter respondents support the use of controlled shooting programs to reduce state park deer over population; and

WHEREAS, Dr. Damian Schmelz, Chairman of the Brown County Park Deer Study Committee, at the February 1994 Natural Resources Commission meeting, stated that the question is not if there will be another hunt at Brown County State Park, but, when it will be.; and

WHEREAS, many of the biologists on the Brown County State Park Deer Study Committee have let it be known that they feel other hunts will be needed for the next few years in order to keep from losing the progress which has been made toward a desirable size deer herd; and

WHEREAS, Dr. Schmelz also stated at the NRC meeting that the Natural Resources Commission should give the Indiana Department of Natural Resources the authority to decide if or when a deer reduction is needed in the state parks and the authority to schedule hunts as needed;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 11 and 12, 1994 at Spring Mill State Park, Mitchell, Indiana, urges the Natural Resources Commission to assign the control of the deer herds in the state parks to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources as suggested by the Chairman of the Brown County State Park Deer Study Committee; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the I.W.F. urges the governor to concur; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges the Indiana Department of Natural Resources to reconsider its decision not to hold a deer reduction shoot in any state park in 1994. Back

Resolution No. 95-3

INDIANA PUBLIC ACCESS PROGRAM

WHEREAS, the Public Access Site Program is one of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Fish and Wildlife's (DFW) highest ranking programs by the Fish and Wildlife staff, and

WHEREAS, 81% of 6223 respondents to a statewide fisherman questionnaire stated "free public access is important to their selection of a place of fish", and

WHEREAS, during the past 50 years, the number of DFW employees available to maintain sites has not kept pace with site acquisition and development, and

WHEREAS, the DFW is working on plans for a new program entitled 'Adopt-A-Public Access Site', and

WHEREAS, the strategic plan for the Adopt-A-Public Access site states that boaters benefit tremendously from the 275 public access sites that have been developed to date; 155 in northern Indiana and 120 in the south, and

WHEREAS, many rivers in east central Indiana are lacking access sites, such as the Salamonie in Blackford and Wells Counties, the Mississinewa in Delaware, Grant and Randolph Counties and the White in Delaware, Madison and Randolph Counties, and

WHEREAS, parking facilities near these rivers are at a premium or even non-existent in these counties, and

WHEREAS, there is little or no public land available in these counties for access site development, and

WHEREAS, these river are small in these counties while access sites with ramps are not always needed, areas to park vehicles are, and

WHEREAS, in some northern counties the DFW is working with the Department of Transportation and county officials to provide more and better access sites, and

WHEREAS, the DFW, fisheries section is responsible for the acquisition phase while the wildlife section is responsible for the site construction and maintenance phase of the public access program

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 10 and 11, 1995 at Turkey Run State Park, Marshall, Indiana urges the Division of Fish and Wildlife to work with state and local officials in an effort to secure more Public Access Sites especially in east central Indiana, and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges all its member clubs to help maintain existing access sites by Adopting-A-Public Site in their area. Back

 

Resolution No. 95-2

CONSERVATION PRIORITIES FOR THE 1995 FARM BILL

WHEREAS, the Food, Agriculture, Conservation and Trade Act (Farm Bill) is scheduled for reauthorization in 1995; and

WHEREAS, the 1995 Farm Bill will have an enormous impact on the quality of Indiana's and the Nation's soil and water resources, abundance and quality of fish and wildlife habitat, and health and safety of food products; and

WHEREAS, the 1995 Farm Bill should recognize that America's farmers are among the world's most productive and agricultural policy has brought great environmental impacts; and

WHEREAS, responsible stewardship of Indiana's and our Nation's farmlands should be the priority of the 1995 Farm Bill; and

WHEREAS, the 1995 Farm Bill should encourage sound farming practices and ensure healthy farms and healthy foods; and

WHEREAS, the 1995 Farm Bill should encourage responsible use of pesticides and fertilizers, protect Indiana's and the Nation's drinking water, curtail polluted agricultural run-off, improve food safety, and conserve wildlife and endangered species habitats;

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation in its Annual Meeting assembled June 9-11, 1995 at Turkey Run State Park, supports a 1995 Farm Bill consisting of four primary policy objectives:

* Retain and improve existing Farm Bill conservation provisions and titles, including the Conservation Reserve Program and Wetlands Reserve Program, Swampbuster and Sodbuster;

*Advance environmentally sound farming by strengthening broad-based conservation and stewardship incentive programs to replace existing subsidy payments.

*Provide special incentives to family farmers and those now excluded from farm programs to enhance the use of environmentally sound farming practices;

*Continue to support a water quality incentive program whereby participating farmers adopt site-specific management plans to protect water quality; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges Congress and the Administration to include these four conservation policy objectives in the reauthorized 1995 Farm Bill.Back

 

Resolution No. 95-1

INDIANA SHOOTING RANGES

WHEREAS, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) has revealed plans to turn portions of Fort Benjamin Harrison into a state park; and

WHEREAS, the IDNR also plans to purchase and run the Form Benjamin Harrison Golf Course in conjunction with the new state park; and

WHEREAS, the IDNR suggests that all Hunter Education classes should provide gun range experience and training whenever possible, and

WHEREAS, preserving any existing gun ranges would help to accomplish this, and

WHEREAS, if plans are to be considered to eliminate the ranges at Fort Benjamin Harrison which fall within the state park area.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 10 and 11, 1995 at Turkey Run State Park, Marshall, Indiana urges the Indiana Department of Natural Resources to retain these ranges for recreational use and gun safety training; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges the IDNR to use some of the Hunter Education Pittman-Robertson funds to open and maintain more ranges in Indiana for safety training and recreational use. Back

 

Resolution No. 96-7

SPORTFISHING HARASSMENT

WHEREAS, the organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has long been a thorn in the side of hunters and trappers; and

WHEREAS, PETA is now starting to focus its harassing tactics on sportfishing; and

WHEREAS, it is PETA's intention to ban all sportfishing; and

WHEREAS, PETA is trying to introduce a new program into the schools; and

WHEREAS, this is their anti-fishing answer to the "National Hunting and Fishing Day" program; and

WHEREAS, PETA is using the acronym "S.O.S." "Save Our Schools"; and

WHEREAS, the acronym is already registered by another environmental, conservation organization for its highly acclaimed "Save Our Streams" stream monitoring program.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 8 and 9, 1996 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges that when an anti-fishing or hunting program is presented in any school system, the Department of Education requires equal time be provided for opposing viewpoints. Back

 

Resolution No. 96-6

I-69 PROPOSED EXTENSION

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation is committed to conserving our state's natural resources and the reasoned expenditure of our tax dollars; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) has plans to build a new highway between Bloomington and Evansville, which would cost at least 800 million dollars and would destroy over 5000 acres of farms and forests; and

WHEREAS, this proposed would result in the fragmentation and loss of habitat to wildlife in the area, including bisecting through the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge; and

WHEREAS, INDOT's extensive draft plan for this highway gives less than one page of consideration to alternatives to build the proposed highway including upgrading existing routes, such as US 41 from Terre Haute to Evansville and US 50 from Bedford to Vincennes, public transportation and education options and the "no build" alternative; and

WHEREAS, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires thorough examination of alternatives to all major federal construction projects before the project can commence; and

WHEREAS, INDOT has failed to meet this federally mandated requirement and is barred from proceeding until it can show that the proposed highway is the best alternative environmentally and locally for our citizens.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 8 and 9, 1996 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges INDOT to revise the Draft Environmental Impact Statement to include an appropriately detailed and objective statement of the highway alternatives, giving alternatives reasonable considerations with fair opportunities for citizens input throughout the process. Back

 

Resolution No. 96-5

THE TEAMING WITH WILDLIFE PROGRAM

WHEREAS, a coalition of outdoor enthusiasts is promoting a new national program dedicated to fish and wildlife conservation, recreation and education; and

WHEREAS, it was initially called the "Wildlife Diversity Initiative" this program will be funded by a federal excise tax on outdoor recreation equipment and supplies not already taxed for Pittman-Robertson and Dingell-Johnson programs; and

WHEREAS, the "Wildlife Diversity Initiative" is now called the "Teaming with Wildlife Program; and

WHEREAS, this program will operate similar to the very successful Pittman-Robertson and Dingell-Johnson programs that sportsmen have supported for over 50 years; and

WHEREAS, hunters and anglers have happily paid an excise tax on sporting arms, ammunition and fishing supplies to benefit the management of game species of fish and wildlife; and

WHEREAS, this program will provide an opportunity for all outdoor enthusiasts to support the management of fish and wildlife species that fall between the harvested and the endangered; and

WHEREAS, just like the Pittman-Robertson and Dingell-Johnson programs a states matching fund need only be 25 percent of the total, and

WHEREAS, this could increase the non-game tax check-off fund fourfold; and

WHEREAS, this program is supported by the National Wildlife Federation and 23 of its State Affiliates; and

WHEREAS, there will soon be a bill submitted in Congress to authorize this program.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 8 and 9, 1996 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana endorses the "Teaming with Wildlife Program"; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the IWF urges that matching moneys do not come from sources which would normally be used for matching funds for the Pittman-Robertson and Dingell-Johnson Programs; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation suggests that, in Indiana, matching funds be obtained from the non-game tax check-off and the Indiana General Fund or other sources that do not raid potential Pittman-Robertson or Dingell-Johnson moneys. Back

 

Resolution No. 96-4

REPEAL THE TIMBER SALVAGE RIDER

WHEREAS, western timber industry interests succeed in 1995 in securing passage of a "timber salvage" rider to a Congressional appropriations bill which suspends all environmental laws in a massive deforestation grab against our remaining ancient forests, including the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act and other national laws; and

WHEREAS, this legislative provision is being used to abuse vast areas of our National Forests, and must be halted if America's remaining ancient forests are to be protected; and

WHEREAS, bills are now pending in the Congress to repeal the "salvage rider", but have not yet been enacted; and

WHEREAS, the President's position is ambivalent in first signing the "salvage rider" bill then publicly acknowledged that was a mistake, but declining thus far to support the repealers or using his executive power to halt the timber raids; and

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 8 and 9, 1996 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana that the "timber salvage" rider be repealed, and that the President be hereby urged to support such repeal; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation commends the timber salvage repeal bills HR 2745 in the House and S 1595 in the Senate, urges their passage and their active support by the President.Back

 

Resolution No. 96-3

PUBLIC RANGELAND MANAGEMENT

WHEREAS, the Public Rangeland Management Act (S 1459) passed the Senate by a 51 to 46 vote; and

WHEREAS, the companion house bill (H.R. 1713) has passed on to the Senate Environment Committee; and

WHEREAS, Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service lands alone annually provide American with 72 million days of hunting and 37 million days of fishing; and

WHEREAS, recreation on BLM lands generates more than $675 million a year; and

WHEREAS, under these bills the following could occur:

1. Public interests, other than grazing, play and insignificant role in the decision-making process affecting land use and range management plans.

2. On-the-ground grazing actions are exempt from review under the National Environmental Policy Act, a crucial tool for protecting fish and wildlife habitat along with other important rangeland resources.

3. Rangeland monitoring is complicated to the point that our agency managers may be unable to adequately respond to obvious resources damage.

4. The Forest Service and BLM may be prevented from assuring adequate water supplies necessary to support fish and wildlife populations, recreation and other non-grazing uses.

5. The National Grasslands are removed from the National Forest System and, without Forest System protection, will be in jeopardy of being transferred to state or private ownership.

6. New private property "rights" for grazing permittees are created, contrary to established public land law and policy, enabling a backdoor giveaway of our public land; and

WHEREAS, 3 percent of the nation's cattle operators and 5 percent of the sheep producers hold federal grazing permits; and

WHEREAS, 2 percent of these permittees, four billionaires, a life insurance company and an oil company, control about half of all BLM acreage grazed; and

WHEREAS, about one-half of the 160 million acres grazed by livestock are in acceptable or "functioning" ecological condition; and

WHEREAS, an even higher percentage of riparian areas are in damaged condition; and

WHEREAS, grazing fees in effect in 1994 were $1.98 per animal Unit Month, compared to as much as $10.00 per AUM on private land; and

WHEREAS, under these bills fees would likely decline to about $1.70 - $1.80; and

WHEREAS, these bills will create Grazing Advisory Councils to make recommendations on range improvement objectives; and

WHEREAS, a majority of the Council members will have to be ranchers, which would again favor livestock interests over fish, wildlife and outdoor recreation.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 8 and 9, 1996 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges our elected officials to oppose these or any other bills which elevate grazing to the dominant use on public lands; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation feels that public lands should be managed for multiple use. Back

 

Resolution No. 96-2

RESOURCE AND WETLAND PROTECTION

WHEREAS, all of Indiana's wetlands and most wetlands around the nation are in serious danager of losing protection if two bills currently being considered by Congress become law; and

WHEREAS, H.R. 961 and S 851 will represent the most sweeping pieces of legislation to weaken federal protection of wetlands ever considered by Congress; and

WHEREAS, these two pieces of legislation would effectively define millions of acres of wetlands out of existence; and

WHEREAS, a minimum of 73 million acres of wetlands or 71 percent of the remaining wetlands in the contiguous U.S. would no longer be designated as wetlands; and

WHEREAS, the definition used in these bills are in direct conflict with the recently released National Academy of Science's report on wetlands; and

WHEREAS, American natural treasures such as the Florida Everglades, Virginia's Dismal Swamp and the picturesque wetlands surrounding the San Franciso and Chesapeake Bays could be lost forever if these bills are approved; and

WHEREAS, in Indiana, the two bills would effectively remove 100 percent of our 750,000 remaining acres of wetlands from protection; and

WHEREAS, many people in our state are not aware that nearly all of our wetlands have been drained, leaving us a scarce 15 percent of what was present prior to settlement; and

WHEREAS, wetlands serve many valuable purposes to people and wildlife; and

WHEREAS, in addition to being the most productive ecosystems, they also protect people during floods by absorbing stormwater like a sponge; and

WHEREAS, wetlands also serve as a crucial component to clean drinking water by filtering out sediment and pollutants before they reach our streams, rivers and lakes; and

WHEREAS, in a November 1995 poll of Indiana residents conducted by Responsive Management, Inc., 80 percent said they strongly or moderately support efforts to protect Indiana's wetlands; and

WHEREAS, in a December 1995 nation wide poll conducted by Linda DiVall of American Viewpoint, 79 percent of the people polled "support current levels of environmental regulations", while only 21 percent responded that "environmental regulations have gone too far".

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 8 and 9, 1996 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana urges congress to defeat H.R. 961 and S. 851 and pass laws that protect, not destroy, our valuable wetlands; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges our elected representatives, National, State and Local to work to conserve all our natural resources for future generations. Back

 

Resolution No. 96-1

NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE PROTECTION

WHEREAS, The National Wildlife Refuge System has been created with the primary purpose of providing secure habitat for populations of wild creatures; and

WHEREAS, the National House of Representatives has passed the "National Wildlife Refuge Improvement Act" (HB-1675), AND

WHEREAS, The "National Wildlife Refuge Improvement Act" would:

1. Fundamentally alter the purpose of the Refuge System by making hunting coequal with habitat conservation;

2. Severely limit the use of the Land and Water Conservation Fund to create new refuges;

3. Create an unneeded exemption process to facilitate military use of refuge lands;

4. Limit the ability of the refuge managers to control use of pesticides for farming on some refuge lands;

5. Weaken the ability of the Fish and Wildlife Service to manage competing public uses of the system;

6. Dilute consideration of the public interest from management decisions; and

WHEREAS, Hunting is allowed on more than half of the Wildlife Refuges and is appropriate when it is compatible with a Refuge's primary purpose - providing secure habitat for wild populations; and

WHEREAS, the present Administration has opened 15 new refuge hunting programs and will open 7 more shortly; and

WHEREAS, more than half of the nation's 508 Wildlife Refuges are open to hunting, representing 95 percent of the acreage in the Refuge System; and

WHEREAS, the Presidents Executive Order of March 25, 1996 has stated that hunting and fishing will continue to be priority uses of the Refuge System; and

WHEREAS, Section 1 of this Executive Order states "The Mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System is to preserve a national network of lands and waters for the conservation and management of fish, wildlife, and plants resources of the United States for the benefit of present and future generations"; and

WHEREAS, Section 2 states "To help ensure a bright future for its treasured national heritage, I hereby affirm the following four guiding principles for the management and general public use of the Refuge System:

(a) Public use. The Refuge System provides important opportunities for compatible wildlife-dependent recreational activities involving hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, and photography, and environmental education and interpretation.

(b) Habitat. Fish and Wildlife will not prosper without high-quality habitat, and without fish and wildlife, traditional uses of refuges cannot be sustained. The Refuge System will continue to conserve and enhance the quality and diversity of fish and wildlife habitat within refuges.

(c) Partnerships. America's sportsmen and women were the first partners who insisted on protecting valuable wildlife habitat within Wildlife Refuges. Conservation partnerships with other Federal agencies, State agencies, Tribes, organizations, industry, and the general public can make significant contributions to the growth and management of the Refuge System.

(d) Public Involvement. The public should be given a full and open opportunity to participate in decisions regarding acquisition and management of our National Wildlife Refuges.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. in annual meeting June 8 and 9, 1996 at McCormick's Creek State Park, Spencer, Indiana supports the guidelines set forth in the President's Executive Order of March 25, 1996; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation urges the U.S. Senate to reject HB-1675 and refuse to weaken our National Wildlife Refuge system. Back

 

Resolution No. 97-3

SENIOR CITIZEN HUNTING AND FISHING FEES

WHEREAS, senior citizens find it more and more difficult to conserve money on a fixed income; and

WHEREAS, the opportunity to fish and hunt has enormous recreation value to senior citizens; and

WHEREAS, the cost of managing and protecting Indiana's fish and wildlife is steadily rising;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation in annual meeting assembled June 7 & 8, 1997 at Pokagon State Park, Angola, Indiana hereby urges the legislature of the State of Indiana to set a fee for an annual hunting license, for citizens of the state of Indiana who are 65 years of age or older, which would be no more than is required for the state to be eligible to receive its full share of Pittmen-Robertson moneys; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the same fee be set for an annual fishing license for these same citizens. Back

 

Resolution No. 97-2

INDIANA BIODIVERSITY INITIATIVE

WHEREAS, the quality of life for all Indiana citizens requires that we work together for sustainable populations of native plants and animals, and ecosystems integrated into an economically productive and ecologically healthy Indiana landscape; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation has devoted resources throughout the last year to the Indiana Biodiversity Initiative by serving on its Steering Committee; and

WHEREAS, a comprehensive state-wide initiative to conserve biological diversity is crucial because only three percent of Indiana, or approximately 700,000 acres, is publicly-owned for the purposes of conserving and protecting natural areas and providing recreational opportunities; and

WHEREAS, protecting our state's natural heritage is important for all Hoosiers, especially the 70 percent or 2.8 million who participate in wildlife-associated activities each year, including hunting, fishing, photographing, observing and wildlife feeding; and

WHEREAS, Indiana's biological diversity is seriously threatened by habitat loss and degradation, as well as prolific exotic species.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation in annual meeting June 7 and 8, 1997 at Pokagon State Park, Angola, Indiana, supports and continues to enhance its participation in the Indiana Biodiversity Initiative; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation should push for land use policies that protect our state's biological diversity. Back

 

Resolution No. 97-1

DIVERSION OF WATER FROM THE GREAT LAKE WATERSHED

WHEREAS, the Crandon Mining Company plans to pump up to 1.7 million gallons of ground water per day for 30 years from a proposed new mine in the Lake Michigan watershed into the Wisconsin River; and

WHEREAS, the Wisconsin River is a tributary of the Mississippi River; and

WHEREAS, the Crandon Mining Company evidently believes that it will cost lost less to build and maintain a 30 mile pipeline to the Wisconsin River than the treatment necessary to keep the water in the Lake Michigan Watershed; and

WHEREAS, a major issue in the Great Lakes water quality is simply maintaining the existing hydrological cycle; and

WHEREAS, this cannot be done if major diversions such as Crandon's are allowed or if cumulative affects of smaller ones are ignored; and

WHEREAS, the Federal Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (FWRD) prohibits any new diversions of water from the Great Lakes watershed unless it is approved by the governor of each Great Lake state; and

WHEREAS, Crandon and the state of Wisconsin take the position that the FRWD applies only to surface water diversions, not ground water diversions; and

WHEREAS, ground water flow is as much a part of Great Lake hydrology as surface flow; and

WHEREAS, the intent of the law should not be defeated by such a weak argument; and

WHEREAS, it has been the Indiana Wildlife Federation's policy, since 1982, to oppose any plan to divert water from the Great Lakes watershed to points outside that watershed for any purpose.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation in annual meeting assembled June 7 & 8, 1997 at Pokagon State Park, Angola, Indiana hereby urges Governor Frank O'Bannon to protect the whole Great Lakes basin by opposing and vetoing any Great Lakes watershed diversions.Back

 

Resolution No. 98-5

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE GRAND KANKAKEE MARSH NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

WHEREAS, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed a 30,000 acre National Wildlife Refuge on the Kankakee River in Indiana and Illinois; and

WHEREAS, the Grand Kankakee Marsh was once located in the Kankakee River watershed in Indiana and was one of the largest inland marshes in the world, comprising over 500,000 acres of wetlands and hardwood forest; and

WHEREAS, its unique location near Lake Michigan to the north, the tallgrass prairies to the west, and forests to the east once made the Marsh home to countless species, and its vast wetlands acreage made it an attraction for visitors from around the world in the 1800s who sought to hunt, fish, and enjoy other outdoor pursuits until it was converted to agricultural and other uses in the 1900s; and

WHEREAS, despite massive habitat loss and fragmentation, the Kankakee River landscape still contains remnants of prairie wetland, tallgrass and mesic prairie, oak savanna, forest lands, riparian woodland corridors, and other important habitat which means more of these associated habitats should be restored; and

WHEREAS, the Great Lakes states are part of a major international flyway for waterfowl and other birds, yet have sustained statewide wetlands habitat loss of, for example, up to 87 percent in Indian and 85 percent in Illinois, which means wetlands in this flyway are strongly needed and should be restored; and

WHEREAS, the Marsh area is currently home to numerous sensitive species, including a migratory stopover site for up to 100 percent of the eastern population of sandhill cranes, so that restoration of habitat within the Marsh will benefit these and over 220 state-listed endangered, threatened, and list-candidate species that exist in the area and could keep others from being federally listed; and

WHEREAS, the restoration of wetlands would provide habitat for numerous species including several on the 1995 List of Migratory Nongame Birds of Management Concern in the United States, and would further prioritize the management area goals under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan to improve populations of migratory waterfowl; and

WHEREAS, restoration would help to reduce flooding, soil erosion, silt deposition and water pollution, and because of the area's proximity to Chicago and other urban areas, would attract ecotourism dollars to an area in need of economic stimulation;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the National Wildlife Federation in its Annual Meeting assembled March 19-22, 1998, in Alexandria, Virginia, supports the establishment of the Grant Kankakee Marsh National Wildlife Refuge. Back

 

Resolution No. 98-4

TEAMING WITH WILDLIFE

WHEREAS, for over fifty years Indiana sportsmen and women have willingly an proudly contributed to fish, game, and wildlife conservation by purchasing licenses, and by paying excise taxes known as the Pittman-Robertson Act, the Dingell-Johnson Act, and the Wallop-Bureau Act on fishing and hunting equipment, and

WHEREAS, 67% of all Hoosiers participate in wildlife-watching activities, and

WHEREAS, many mammals, amphibians, birds, reptiles, insects, and other species are in decline in Indiana as a result of habitat loss, and

WHEREAS, use and demands of non-consumptive conservationists is growing at a rapid pace, and

WHEREAS, use and demands of habitats will continue the explosive spiral upward, and

WHEREAS, pressures on all wildlife will increase and habitat quantity and quality may decline, and

WHEREAS, Teaming with Wildlife will add to the conservation success for all outdoor enthusiasts by securing and improving wildlife habitat for the benefit of all species, and

WHEREAS, Indiana would be eligible to receive an estimated $6.8 million in matching funds, and

WHEREAS, a broad-based coalition of over 2,600 groups and businesses has been established to support Teaming with Wildlife, and

WHEREAS, Teaming with Wildlife will restore many critically low species populations, conserve millions of acres of habitat nationally, and will provide countless hours of recreation on our lands and waterways.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 13-14, 1998 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana emphatically supports passage of federal legislation establishing a federal excise tax of up to 5% on supplies, equipment, and products traditionally purchased by non-consumptive wildlife enthusiasts. Back

 

Resolution No. 98-3

SAVING OUR WATERSHEDS

WHEREAS, "non-point" sources of pollution such as agricultural runoff, homeowner runoff, atmospheric deposition, and contaminated sediments have become Indiana's largest water-quality problem, causing many of our water resources to be unsafe for fishing, swimming, and wildlife, and

WHEREAS, Indiana is not effectively using a watershed protection provision of the Clean Water Act known as the "Total Maximum Daily Loads" (TMDLs") provision, and

WHEREAS, TMDLs establish the amount of pollutants a body of water can accept while still remaining healthy, and then must be developed and implemented to keep pollutants from all sources from exceeding established limits, and

WHEREAS, Indiana must identify the water-quality limited waters, names of pollutants causing water quality problems, establish a prioritization of impaired waters, develop a listing of waters targeted for TMDL development within a two-year time frame, and assure that public participation has been provided, and

WHEREAS, the Clean Water Act's TMDL provision, Section 303(d), is designed to attack pollution regardless of its source and provide controls intended to be enforceable, but Indiana is failing to protect our state's precious water resources from diverse sources of pollution,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation assembled at its annual meeting June 13-14, 1998, in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana, demands that the Indiana Department of Environmental Management aggressively use the Clean Water Act's TMDL provision to identify the Hoosier states' damaged waters and the pollutants causing impairments, and to develop and enforce watershed cleanup plans immediately. Back

 

Resolution No. 98-2

PIGEON RIVER PROTECTION

WHEREAS, the West Otter Lake Association (WOLA) has asked the Pigeon Creek Drainage Board (PCDB) for help to alleviate flooding at Otter Lake; and

WHEREAS, the WOLA believes that the flooding is caused by the Department of Natural Resources raising the height of the Mongo Mill Pond by two (2) feet from time to time; and

WHEREAS, the PCDB believes that by dredging Pigeon Creek (usually referred to as the Pigeon River) from Otter Lake to County Road 175 North the flood problems will be relieved; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Department of Commerce (IDOC) has requested more information on environmental impact; and

WHEREAS, the PCDB has sent the IDOC a letter of intent to indicate that a formal application will be made later; and

WHEREAS, an Indiana University Geological Survey (IGL) states that the Mongo Mill Pond is Twenty-nine (29) lower than Otter Lake; and

WHEREAS, the IGL states four (4) main reasons for the flooding at Otter Lake, including homes that have been constructed only one (1) or two (2) feet above the lake; and

WHEREAS, the IGL states in conclusion: No connection can be demonstrated between adjustments of the water level in Mongo Mill Pond and reported high lake levels upstream in the Pigeon River. Pigeon River maintains a relatively high gradient and fast-flowing channel characteristics between the two, whereas the flow of shallow ground water is strongly northward, away from Otter Lake and toward the millpond. Therefore, it does not appear possible for rises in the millpond to affect the level of Otter Lake without violating the basic laws of physics and fluid flow. Instead, temporary periods of high water levels in Otter Lake are very probably the results of sudden increases in surface runoff and groundwater discharge to the lake stemming from major rainfall events. These inputs overwhelm the ability of the artificially constructed outlet to drain the lake in a timely manner. The problem is exacerbated by the proximity of some homes to the lake; and

WHEREAS, the Pigeon River Fish and Wildlife Area is one of the areas that the DNR has chosen for the reintroduction of river otters; and

WHEREAS, County Road 175 North is approximately three and one half (3 ½) miles within the boundaries of the Pigeon River Fish and Wildlife Area;

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 13-14, 1998 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana opposes any attempt to dredge any part of the Pigeon River which lies within the boundaries of the Pigeon River Fish and Wildlife Area. Back

 

Resolution No. 98-1

RESTRUCTURING AND DOWNSIZING OF THE INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

WHEREAS, in late 1993 the "Governor's Task Force on Environmental Permit Fees" chaired by then Lt. Gov. Frank O'Bannon and consisting of representatives of industries and municipalities, environmentalists, legislators and other interested parties recommended a minimum IDEM staffing level of about 1230 full-time professional staff and the budget to adequately fund them, and

WHEREAS, in the November 4, 1993, Task Force meeting, the then IDEM Commissioner stated that proposed staffing and funding of 1230 positions "was not adequate to run the required programs, it was only a stop gap number to keep programs alive" and "is a very contentious issue and open to politics - let us please keep peace so that we may give Indiana the programs that are needed"; and

WHEREAS, state and federal mandates may have changed, but have not decreased, and, therefore, staffing needs at IDEM are still in excess of 1230 positions; and

WHEREAS, the staff levels in the Departments of Water Management and Environmental Response in particular were never increased to their projected needs level; and

WHEREAS, over the last four years administrations have reduced requested staffing and funding for IDEM and have frozen many critical positions within the agency resulting in unjustified reductions from 1230 to 990 positions in spite of the statutorily - authorized full funding and staffing of the Department; and

WHEREAS, the use of consultants by the Department, some assigned to policy-making positions, has increased while technical staff positions, essential to the long-term health of the Department have been severely reduced; and

WHEREAS, when, under prior IDEM management a proposal for a reduced staffing level of about 990 was prepared, incomplete estimates were made of the staff cost and these estimates were used to prepare budget estimates which resulted in financial shortfalls in the Department; and

WHEREAS, the permit fees mandated by SEA 417, PL 16 in 1994 were created specifically to ensure adequate funding for the 1230 positions recommended as the minimum level of staffing for the agency by the Governor's Task Force; and

WHEREAS, because of hiring freezes IDEM has never filled all of the 1230 positions, despite its continued collection of permit fees, and as a result has not addressed many of the deficiencies intended to be corrected by the increased staffing, particularly the NPDES permit backlog; and

WHEREAS, IDEM currently is preparing to eliminate at least 60 staff-level positions, which only will exacerbate IDEM's inability to meet federal and state mandates and its mission of protecting Indiana's environment; and

WHEREAS, it is unjustifiable to strip IDEM further of strategic technical positions and cripple further the Department's ability to implement critical human health, environmental and economic development programs, particularly with a large State budget surplus; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation (IWF) believes the agency has not followed proper hiring procedures for filing merit positions, and has filled some positions with political appointees; and

WHEREAS, environmentalists, municipal managers and officials, industry leaders and legislators recognize the need for an adequately staffed, funded and fully professional IDEM staff; and

WHEREAS, all these circumstances have resulted in significantly increased politicization and demoralization of the Department's staff; and

WHEREAS, the voters of Indiana and the IWF have trusted Governor O'Bannon to restore and energize IDEM and not to politicize nor privatize it as his gubernatorial opponent promised.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting June 13-14, 1998 in Brown County State Park, Nashville, Indiana urges:

1. That IDEM immediately stop its ongoing elimination of Staff-level positions.

2. That merit hiring procedures at IDEM be restored fully, the practice of filing merit positions with non-merit appointees be ended and improperly appointed personnel be terminated.

3. That the Governor implement as quickly as practical the minimum staffing level of 1230 recommended by the "Governor's Task Force on Environmental Permit Fees" in 1993. Back

 

Resolution No. 99-07

QUALITY DEER MANAGEMENT IN INDIANA

WHEREAS, the current size of the Indiana deer herd has been balanced to satisfy hunters, the agriculture business and wildlife watchers, and

WHEREAS, Quality Deer Management (QDM) would require a further drastic reduction in the size of Indiana's deer herd, and

WHEREAS, this would result in lost hunting opportunities and a significant loss of Pitman Robertson money coming back to Indiana, and

WHEREAS, QDM in other states has lead to the leasing of private property for the purpose of deer hunting, and

WHEREAS, leasing will leave property owners in Indiana open to liability lawsuits.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting on June 11-13, 1999 at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana, does not support Quality Deer Management in Indiana.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. strongly urges the Department of Natural Resources to resist any attempts to change the current deer management practices. Back

 

Resolution No. 99-06

WHITE TAIL DEER HUNTING PRESERVE

WHEREAS, it is currently illegal to hunt white tail deer in enclosed hunting preserves in Indiana, and

WHEREAS, the privatization of native species goes against modern wildlife management practices, and

WHEREAS, there is a threat of disease being transmitted to wild populations of deer, and

WHEREAS, preserve hunting will tarnish the image of ethical sportsman and conservationist.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting on June 11-13, 1999 at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana, wants to urge the Indiana General Assembly to resist any request to change the current law(s) that exist as they apply to hunting preserves. Back

 

Resolution 99-05

LAWSUIT AGAINST INDR FROM FAWN RIVER RESIDENTS GROUP

WHEREAS, in a tort claim filed with the Indiana Attorney General on February 3, 1999, by a group of Fawn River property owners stating their intent to sue the State of Indiana and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources for $70 million; and

WHEREAS, this tort claim is based on the allegation that the IDNR and many of its officials and employees destroyed the river's ecosystem when IDNR employees lowered a dam at the Fawn River Fish Hatchery May 18, 1999; and

WHEREAS, the group further claims that millions of cubic yards of thick, gooey much rolled downstream when the dam's gate was lifted, destroyed everything living in its wake including rare clams, tens of thousands of fish and the very vegetation and life forms upon which the mussels and fish feed upon; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Law Enforcement documented the actual number of fish lost at 153 due to the drawdown of the 1.75 acre millpond on May 18, 1999; and

WHEREAS, further surveys conducted by various biologists from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program, its Fisheries section and the Division of Soil Conservation, all summarizes the impact of fish, wildlife, fauna and aquatic life forms as "minimal," and that current mussel populations would indicate that the Fawn River is in excellent overall health contrary to the allegations made in the tort claim; and

WHEREAS, additional comparisons of these surveys with the data compiled in surveys conducted prior to 1998, show nearly identical or slightly improved water quality in the Fawn River, again contrary to all allegations made in the tort claim;

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation assembled in annual meeting on June 12, 1999, at Clifty Falls State Park near Madison, Indiana urges the State of Indiana and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources reject this tort claim as unfounded and without merit and to resist or fight any and all law suits or other legal actions that may result from this incident with all its available resources. Back

 

Resolution No. 99-4

NATURAL RESOURCES, CONSERVATION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION IN INDIANA SCHOOLS

WHEREAS, natural resources, conservation, and environmental education has not been foremost in Indiana schools curriculum; and,

WHEREAS, the need and demand for quality natural resources, conservation, and environmental education exists; and,

WHEREAS, many other states have taken necessary steps to improve both the quality and quantity of various education programs and supplements; and,

WHEREAS, many colleges and universities have revamped education programs that recognize the importance of natural resources, conservation, and environmental education; and,

WHEREAS, the importance of this education cannot be understated,

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation assembled in annual meeting at Clifty Falls State Park near Madison, Indiana on June 12, 1999 urges the Indiana State Board of Education to thoroughly examine their policies and guidelines for natural resources, conservation, and environmental education and to make participation in this education more prevalent and more consistent throughout all of Indiana. Back

 

Resolution No. 99-3

IDNR SALARY INEQUITIES

WHEREAS, the Governor of Indiana, the Director of the Department of Natural Resources, the Indiana Department of State Personnel, and others have been successful in addressing the overall pay structure of most employees of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources; and,

WHEREAS, most employees have received substantial pay adjustments and the salary ranges of most positions have been upwardly modified to more accurately compensate these employees based on job requirements, education, and job functions; and,

WHEREAS, most positions are now somewhat in line with like positions in other states; and,

WHEREAS, gross salary inequities still exist, mainly with professional biologists, professional administrative staff, and professional managerial staff; and,

WHEREAS, these few positions represent the core of the IDNR as well as the major influence on important issues and policies of the IDNR; and,

WHEREAS, the response of the Indiana Department of State Personnel toward resolving the inequity suffered by the aforementioned IDNR professionals has been poor at best; and,

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation assembled in annual meeting on June 12, 1999 at Clifty Falls State Park near Madison Indiana demands the fair and just treatment of these neglected professionals by the Indiana Department of State Personnel and that these pay structures be adjusted accordingly and back pay granted to June, 1998. Back

 

Resolution No. 99-2

FARMLAND PROTECTION AND THE HERITAGE TRUST PROGRAM

WHEREAS, Public Law 69-1992 established the Indiana Heritage Trust Program; and

WHEREAS, the purpose of the Indiana Heritage Trust Program is to acquire real property that are examples of outstanding natural features and habitats and have historical and archeological significance and provide areas for conservation, recreation and restoration of native biological diversity; and,

WHEREAS, the program is designed to ensure that the State's natural heritage is preserved or enhanced for succeeding generations by acquiring, preserving, and enhancing real property for new and existing state parks, state forests, nature preserves, fish and wildlife areas, wetlands, trails and river corridors; and,

WHEREAS, the success of the Indiana Heritage Trust Program is evident by the fact that the first six years of the program's existence (1993-1998) has resulted in 1933 acquisition projects protecting over 27,500 acres; and,

WHEREAS, Indiana Heritage Trust Program accomplishments to date have exceeded all expectations; and,

WHEREAS, the conservation partnership that has evolved among the residents of Indiana through their purchase of environmental license plates, members of this Indiana General Assembly, Indiana Executive Administrations, and the highly leveraged conservation partnerships with private/non-profit groups such as North American Waterfowl Management Plan, Federal Wetlands Reserve Program, North American Wetlands Conservation Act, The Lilly Endowment, Audubon Society, The Nature Conservancy, The Shirley Heinz Foundation, Acres, Ind., C.I.L.T.I., and many others have donated monies at least equal to the funds generated by Indiana Heritage Trust and thus allowing many more areas and special places to be protected and conserved for future generations; and

WHEREAS, farmland in Indiana is disappearing at ever increasing rates primarily due to urban sprawl and other types of human intervention; and,

WHEREAS, some support for the protection of farmland to be placed under the authority of the Indiana Heritage Trust Program has been reported; and,

WHEREAS, the Indiana Heritage Trust Program has to date preserved and protected some 27,500 total acres for all Hoosiers; and,

WHEREAS, there are some 11,800,000 acres of farmland throughout the State of Indiana; and, Back

 

Resolution No. 99-1

CONSERVATION REINVESTMENT ACT OF 1999

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation, an organization of affiliated conservation clubs and concerned citizens of Indiana, is dedicated to habitat protection for wildlife in Indiana; and

WHEREAS, the House of Representatives Bill H.R. 701, the Conservation Reinvestment Act of 1999 , Title III provides permanent dedicated funds to the states for the conservation of wildlife and wildlife-related education; and

WHEREAS, the only current source of funding in Indiana for non-game species is a voluntary tax check-off and contributions; and

WHEREAS, we support Indiana District 3 Representative Tim Roemer's, co-sponsorship of the legislation, H.R. 701, the Conservation and Reinvestment Act of 1999 ; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation is dedicated to protecting wildlife habitat and to ensuring public education about wildlife in Indiana,

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting on June 11, 12, 13, 1999 at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana urges its 30,000 members and supporters to endorse the passage of the Conservation and Reinvestment Act of 1999 , H.R. 701. Back

 

Resolution No. 99-1

CONSERVATION REINVESTMENT ACT OF 1999

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation, an organization of affiliated conservation clubs and concerned citizens of Indiana, is dedicated to habitat protection for wildlife in Indiana; and

WHEREAS, the House of Representatives Bill H.R. 701, the Conservation Reinvestment Act of 1999 , Title III provides permanent dedicated funds to the states for the conservation of wildlife and wildlife-related education; and

WHEREAS, the only current source of funding in Indiana for non-game species is a voluntary tax check-off and contributions; and

WHEREAS, the Conservation and Reinvestment Act of 1999 represents a good first step to secure conservation funding and is co-sponsored by Indiana District 3 Representative Tim Roemer; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation is dedicated to protecting wildlife habitat and to ensuring public education about wildlife in Indiana,

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting on June 11, 12, 13, 1999 at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison, Indiana urges its 30,000 members and supporters to endorse the passage of the Conservation and Reinvestment Act of 1999 , H.R. 701 and its companion Senate Bill S.B. 25 with the following improvements:

1. The bills provide permanent funding not subject to the annual appropriations process;

2. The bills prioritize funding for non-game wildlife;

3. The bills require state fish and wildlife agencies to develop state wide conservation plans to identify the areas of greatest need for conservation funding;

4. The bills provide for public meetings or citizen advisory committees to help guide state programs.

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