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To promote the conservation, sound management, and sustainable use of Indiana's wildlife and wildlife habitat through education, advocacy, and action.

2000's Resolutions

Emergency Resolution No. 00

LAWSUIT FILED BY FAWN RIVER RESIDENTS GROUP

WHEREAS, on May 16, 2000, lawsuits were filed in Allen County Circuit Court, Cause Number 02C01-0005-CT52 and U.S. Circuit Court, Northeast Indiana District, Case Number 1:00CV0219, by a group of Fawn River property owners seeking over $38 million in penalties from the State of Indiana, Governor Frank O'Bannon, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Director Larry Macklin and four IDNR fish hatchery employees; and

WHEREAS, these lawsuits are based on the allegations that the IDNR and many of its officials and employees destroyed the river's ecosystem when IDNR employees lowered a dam at the Fawn River Hatchery May 18, 1998; and

WHEREAS, the group further accuses the IDNR of an "act of environmental eco-terrorism" by purposefully flooding a 5-mile stretch of the Fawn River with sediment and debris on May 18, 1998, that caused "catastrophic death and loss to the aquatic biosystem of the river and severe loss to the aesthetic, recreational and economic value and uses of the river; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Law Enforcement documented the actual number of fish killed at 157 due to the drawdown of the 1.75 acre Fawn River Fish Hatchery mill pond on May 18, 1998 and that the sediment inadvertently released caused no permanent damage to the Fawn River; and

WHEREAS, further surveys conducted by various biologists from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Non-game and Endangered Wildlife Program, its Fisheries section and the Division of Soil Conservation, all summarize the impact to fish, wildlife, fauna and aquatic life forms as "minimal," and that current mussel populations would indicate that the Fawn River is in excellent overall health contrary to the allegations made in the lawsuit; and

WHEREAS, additional comparisons of these surveys with the data compiled in surveys conducted prior to 1998, show nearly identical or slightly improved water quality in the Fawn River, again contrary to all allegations made in the lawsuits; and

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation assembled in their annual meeting on June 12, 1999, at Clifty Falls State Park near Madison, Indiana unanimously urged the State of Indiana and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources in Resolution #99-5 to reject the then tort claim as unfounded and without merit and to resist or fight any and all lawsuits or other legal actions that may result from this incident with all its available resources,

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that on June 3, 2002 the Indiana Wildlife Federation, assembled for their annual meeting at McCormick's Creek State Park near Spencer, Indiana, re-affirm IWF Resolution 99-5; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, in the strongest possible of terms, insist that the State of Indiana continues to resist, reject and fight these unfounded and frivolous lawsuits with all available resources, not agree to any out of court settlements, and win this action for the well being of all the citizens of the State of Indiana. Back

Resolution No. 2001-01

FOR PROTECTION OF THE GREAT LAKES FROM EXOTIC SPECIES

RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 15-17, 2001 at Spring Mill State Park in Mitchell, Indiana and working in concert with colleague conservation and environmental organizations and industrial and municipal organizations affected by aquatic species, urges the U.S. Congress to immediately counter this threat by enacting legislation to protect the Great Lakes from Undesirable exotic species and pathogens by requiring that such treatment of ballast water of all ships entering the Great Lakes, including ships with "No Ballast On Board," NOBOB's, or moving between Great Lakes ports, so as to effectively eliminate all viable organisms without damage to the environment; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Northeast Indiana Trout Association (NEITA) urges federal authorities, upon enactment of this legislation, to take immediate action to implement and enforce its provisions and intent, and to inspect vessels as necessary to ensure compliance with the law, and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the NEITA urges the Indiana Legislature also pass an equally restrictive bill to regulate ballast water and NOBOB's in Indiana's waters to provide interim protection until such time as Federal legislation is enacted to adequately protect all our Great Lakes waters. Back

Resolution 2001-02

OPPOSING BIG GAME HUNTING PRESERVES

RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 15-17, 2001 at Spring Mill State Park in Mitchell, Indiana is opposed to the private ownership and commercialization of big game animals for the purpose of a captive big game shooting preserve. Back

Resolution EM 2001-03

URGING POSTPONEMENT OF U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE INTERIM GUIDELINES FOR FIELD TRAILS

RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 15-17, 2001 at Spring Mill State Park in Mitchell, Indiana urges the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to postpone the "Interim Guidelines for Field Trails" (Guidelines).

IWF also asks the National Wildlife Federation to urge the USFWS to postpone the Guidelines. Back

Resolution No. 2003-01

IMPORTATION OF DOMESTIC DEER AND ELK

WHEREAS, in the last five years, Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) has spread from the endemic area of Colorado to currently include 12 states and 2 Canadian provinces and

WHEREAS, CWD control and eradication is costing other states millions of dollars and

WHEREAS, Indiana has not discovered CWD in its wild deer herd after a hunter harvested surveillance program during the 2002 season and

WHEREAS, the Indiana State Board of Animal Health currently maintains a moratorium on the imports of domestic deer and elk and

WHEREAS, the Indiana State Board of Animal Health is the regulatory agency that oversees wildlife disease concerns for the state and

WHEREAS, Indiana's wild deer herd generates $280,000 dollars of revenue for state and local economies and

WHEREAS, the introduction of CWD into Indiana's wild deer would have a devastating effect on this economy and

WHEREAS, CWD is proving to be virtually impossible to control in wild deer herds in other states,

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation at its Annual Meeting assembled at Pokagan State Park, June 6 and 7 2003, supports a continued moratorium on importation of domestic deer and elk and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana State Board of Animal Health will be held accountable to the citizens of Indiana should CWD be introduced into the wild deer herd from domestic populations of deer and elk. Back

Resolution 2003-02

FOREST MANAGEMENT

WHEREAS, timber sales in Indiana State Forests provide an economic benefit to local communities as well as the State Division of Forestry and,

WHEREAS, timber sales are conducted using best management practices to prevent soil erosion and to protect water quality and,

WHEREAS, prior to the sale of timber from our state forests, forest managers conduct an Environmental Assessment as stipulated in Indiana Code to determine if an Environmental Impact Statement is necessary and,

WHEREAS, timber sales are one forest resource management tool available to forest managers and,

WHEREAS, forest resource management involves a variety of activities designed to enhance the natural and cultural resources on state forest lands and,

WHEREAS, forest resource management involves activities designed to manipulate and improve habitat for fish and wildlife species and,

WHEREAS, combined with other activities provide an overall diversity of habitat structure beneficial for sustainability of a wide variety of wildlife species

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation at its Annual Meeting assembled at Pokagon State Park, June 6 and 7, 2003 supports timber sales in Indiana's State Forests as one tool for forest managers to use to improve wildlife habitat, bio-diversity and maintain healthy forests. Back

Resolution 2003-03

REAFFIRMATION OF THE CLEAN WATER ACT OF 1977

WHEREAS, the 2001 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County (SWANCC) vs. United States Army Corps has limited authority of federal agencies to extend Clean Water Act protections to non-navigable, intrastate, isolated waters based solely on their use by migratory birds, and

WHEREAS, this ruling removed Clean Water Act protection from 20 million acres of the nation's wetlands, including approximately eighty percent (80%) of Indiana's remaining isolated wetlands, and

WHEREAS, isolated wetlands in Indiana are one of our most threatened resources, and

WHEREAS, Indiana has already lost approximately eighty-five percent (85%) of our original wetland habitat, and

WHEREAS, wetlands provide wildlife habitat, groundwater recharge functions, pollution filtration, flood control, and outdoor recreational opportunities, and

WHEREAS, H.R. 962 and S. 473 reaffirms the U.S. Congress's original intent to broadly interpret the Clean Water Act's jurisdiction in order to meet the goal of restoring the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation's waters, and

WHEREAS, H.R. 962 and S. 473 would restore authority to the Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency to issue or deny permits for wetland activities such draining and filling,

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation at its Annual Meeting assembled at Pokagon State Park, June 6 and 7, 2003 encourages Indiana's Congressional delegation to support H.R. 962 and S. 473. Back

Resolution 2003-04

SUPPORTING REGIONAL SEWER DISTRICTS

WHEREAS residential septic systems drain into and pollute our lakes, and

WHEREAS the residential septic systems also pollute the underground aquifers, and

WHEREAS the experience of LaGrange County has proven the value of sewers over septic systems in protecting the water quality of its lakes; and

WHEREAS financial assistance is generally available to assist County Regional Sewer Districts; and

WHEREAS all citizens benefit from improved water quality of Indiana lakes,

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, at its annual meeting assembled at Pokagon State Park, June 7, 2003, calls on Indiana citizens to take initiative in forming County Regional Sewer Districts to implement sewer treatment systems for residential communities situated on or near Indiana's lakes; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation calls on applicable state and county agencies to encourage such citizen initiative; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that elected members of the Indiana House and Senate cooperate with citizens and state and county agencies by providing legislation to support efforts at establishing such sewer districts. Back

Submitted by Jack Dold for the
LaGrange County Lakes Council, Inc.

Resolution 2003-05

WILDLIFE DISEASES;
RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY

WHEREAS our nation's wildlife is increasingly exposed to disease agents, both native and exotic, such as Chronic Wasting Disease and West Nile Virus; and

WHEREAS National Wildlife Federation adopted NWF Resolution 9-2003 at their annual meeting assembled March 27-29, 2003 in Washington, DC, (attached); and

WHEREAS Indiana Department of Natural Resources must be given the authority for management of wildlife diseases by wildlife professionals,

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that Indiana Wildlife Federation at its annual meeting assembled at Pokagon State Park, June 7, 2003, supports the appropriation of state funds to Indiana Department of Natural Resources for research and management of diseases that occur in and affect wildlife; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Indiana Wildlife Federation opposes those portions of the Animal Health Protection Act that assert the authority of the Department of Agriculture over state and federal fish and wildlife management agencies and encourages revisions to clearly delineate that agriculture authorities apply to domesticated animals only; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Indiana Wildlife Federation reaffirms: its opposition to big game and trophy ranches because of the increased risk of disease; its support of cooperative management of wildlife diseases by wildlife professionals; and its support of all wildlife to access public lands habitats necessary for their population and genetic sustainability. Back

Submitted by Phil Alexander

Emergency Resolution 2003-E1

OPPOSITION OF NEW REGULATED DRAIN DESIGNATION OF THE ELKHART RIVER WATERSHED IN NOBLE AND LAGRANGE COUNTIES

WHEREAS: on Wednesday, May 28, 2003, at a "Section 65" public hearing conducted by the Joint Noble-LaGrange County Drainage Board held in the Central Noble Middle School, Albion, Indiana, said Board by a vote of 4-1 designated that portion of the Elkhart River and tributaries within their jurisdiction a "New Regulated Drain;" and

WHEREAS: this designation encompasses over 40 miles of navigable waterway plus the tributaries in this almost 200,000 acre watershed directly affecting 15,000 property owners; and

WHEREAS: in order to pay for this designation, a $5.00 "Special Tax" will be "accessed" to these property owners, amounting to an estimated $128,000 per year annual income for the Noble and Lagrange County Surveyor's Office's while further authorizing an unrestricted easement to both stream banks, without compensation to or approval of the affected property owners, to facilitate any "required repairs" and

WHEREAS: this decision is in direct contrast to the overwhelming evidence, the written and verbal comments and the letters of opposition presented by numerous property owners, city and town governments, conservation organizations and other groups and individuals present at the May 14, 2003 hearing including the letter presented by the Indiana Wildlife Federation's Executive Committee expressing our concerns and opposition and further urging them to vote "No" to the then proposal; and

WHEREAS: the Indiana Wildlife Federation believes the members of the Joint Noble-LaGrange County Drainage Board "FAILED" to properly investigate all options open to them to maintain this valuable watershed while minimizing cost and adverse environmental impact and further FAILED" to listen to the desires and wants of the vast majority of those present; and

WHEREAS: the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Northeastern Indiana Trout Association, Indiana Department of Natural Resources-Division of Waters, and numerous other state and regional conservation groups, organizations, local governments and individuals believe the Joint Noble-LaGrange County Drainage Board already has the authority this "new designation" gives them under current Indiana and Federal statute or regulations by simply following established permitting processes; and

WHEREAS: this designation is in direct disparity to Indiana Wildlife Federation's mission statement and existing IWF Resolutions, specifically Resolution #66-10, Shoreline Alterations; Resolution #78-6, Wetland Protection; Resolution #81-9, Extraction Of Minerals From Public Waterways; and Resolution #98-1, Pigeon River Protection,

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: at our Annual Meeting held on June 6-7, 2003 at Pokagon State Park, the Indiana Wildlife Federation opposes the decision of the Joint Noble-LaGrange County Drainage Board designating the Elkhart River in those counties as a "New regulated Drain," and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: that because of the irresponsible waste of money and natural resources created by this designation, the Indiana Wildlife Federation encourages and supports all legal opposition initiated by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Conservation Organizations, property owners and other individuals that would result in the reversal of this unfounded, unwarranted and possibly illegal designation.

Prepared and presented by the Northeastern Indiana Trout Association for the consideration and approval of the Indiana Wildlife Federation at their annual meeting held at Pokagon State Park on June 6-7, 2003. Back

 

Resolution No. 2008 - 01

ENERGY LAND RECLAMATION AND PURCHASE OF MINNEHAHA FISH AND WILDLIFE AREA

WHEREAS, the amount of hunting, fishing and other outdoor recreation areas, open to the general public has become less and less each year, and

WHEREAS, the reasons for this are complex involving: 1) increased demand related to population increases, (2) decreased acreages available because of habitat destruction, and (3) increased restriction of private lands to the general public because of liability, vandalism, over use, etc., and

WHEREAS, there are large acreages of land suitable for public outdoor recreational uses that are owned by coal companies but are closed to public access, and

WHEREAS, with modern mining technology and planning, coal mining does offer the opportunity to reclaim mined land specifically for the development of fish and wildlife habitat as the post mining land use, and
WHEREAS, Bluegrass Fish and Wildlife Area is an excellent example of where Amax Coal Company designed their whole Reclamation Plan specifically for Fish and Wildlife as the post mining land use for the 2532 acres, which after bond release was made available to the DNR, and

WHEREAS, the existing energy and mineral shortage has increased pressure for the extraction of minerals from public lands, and

WHEREAS, many of the public lands on which energy and mineral extraction is proposed offer important wildlife habitat and recreational opportunities, and

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting on June 7, 2008 in Brown County State Park, in Nashville, Indiana strongly urges the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to take steps to encourage energy companies to design fish and wildlife habitat land use into their permits and reclamation plans and show how they can take advantage of this opportunity to create fish and wildlife habitat,

AND BE IT FUTHER RESOLVED that the DNR encourage energy companies recovering gas, oil and mineral resources on State owned surface properties to minimize the surface disturbance and restore all disturbed areas to a fish and wildlife habitat land use.

AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the DNR uses the above recommendations to purchase the surface rights of the Minnehaha Fish and Wildlife Area. Back

 

Resolution No.  2008 - 2

GREAT LAKES RESTORATION

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation, an organization of affiliated conservation clubs and concerned citizens of Indiana; and

WHEREAS, the Great Lakes comprise almost 20 percent of the world’s surface fresh water; and

WHEREAS, the Great Lakes supply drinking water to more than 40 million U.S. and Canadian residents; and

WHEREAS, the Great Lakes support a diversity of wildlife, a world class fishery, maritime trade, industry and agriculture; and

WHEREAS, a plan is needed to reclaim sensitive coastal wetlands, critical habitat, stopping the introduction of invasive species, eliminating toxic pollution, reducing polluted runoff, cleaning up contaminated areas; and

WHEREAS, over the years many piecemeal restoration plans have been drafted and few implemented; and

WHEREAS, a sustainable restoration plan and funding is needed; and

WHEREAS, one of the goals of the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. is protection and restoration of air, waters, wildlife, forest and field.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc. assembled in annual meeting on June 7, 2008 at Brown County State Park in Nashville, Indiana, urges its members and supporters to encourage Congress to develop and pass a Great Lakes Restoration Plan with sufficient funding to implement the plan. Back

 

Resolution No.  2008 - 3 

ENERGY POLICY

WHEREAS, good energy policy is based on sound scientific and economic principles, must be environmentally friendly, and support our national security; and,

WHEREAS, energy conservation by all accounts makes the most sense economically, environmentally, and for national security reasons; and,

WHEREAS, there is consensus among economic policy makers that energy conservation makes the most economic sense; and,  

WHEREAS, there are opportunities for new and renewable energy sources, and such new sources must be promoted based on sound science, best known technology, make economic sense, and be environmentally friendly with a holistic view to avoid addressing one environmental concern while creating a new concern; and,

WHEREAS, many times new and conceptual energy sources need further research, a successful working prototype of proven or best known technology, and a full national debate before any new energy source should be promoted on a national scale; and,

WHEREAS, new energy solutions are never perfect, and mitigation strategies can be implemented to minimize negative environmental impacts; and,

WHEREAS, any endorsement of a new energy source should be fully vetted knowing the full understanding of all environmental impacts, within the Indiana Wildlife Federation resulting in a strong consensus; and,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 7, 2008, at Brown County State Park, in Nashville, Indiana, and its policy will be based on energy conservation as a priority, and will support energy conservation practices and legislation at the local, state and national levels.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the Indiana Wildlife Federation will support new energy sources after due diligence and a holistic review of the energy concept to ensure it meets common sense, is good public policy overall, and is environmentally sound. Back

 

Resolution No.  2008 - 4

CONSERVATION TILLAGE FARMING

WHEREAS, Since 1986 The Indiana Wildlife Federation has recognized the importance of good soil and water conservation as evidenced by Resolution 86-3; and

WHEREAS, as the nation pursues a policy of increased bio-fuels production and such bio-fuels will require an increase in farm production, leading to greater demands on soil conservation and increased potential farm runoff; and,

WHEREAS, agricultural technology has advanced to include no-till farming methods and precision application of fertilizer and pesticides, which greatly reduce sedimentation and farm run-off, while improving production efficiencies; and,

WHEREAS, according to the Conservation Information Technology Center wildlife greatly benefits from conservation or no-till farm operations; and,

WHEREAS, the demand for farm conservation assistance exceeds the federal and state resources with yearly demand exceeding farm conservation funds available; and,

WHEREAS, new and creative means of promoting greater farm conservation methods are needed to supplement Federal Farm Bill conservation program shortfalls, while developing a cooperative conservation spirit among all stakeholders.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 7, 2008, at Brown County State Park, in Nashville, Indiana, recommends the National Wildlife Federation research the potential of creating a special federal income tax, or investment, credits (or accelerated depreciation) to encourage farmers to adopt no-till farming methods and the use of advanced technologies that allow for precision use of fertilizer and pesticides; and, 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the Indiana Wildlife Federation recommends that the National Wildlife Federation pursue a new tax or investment credit for conservation farming with other conservation groups, the American Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, National Association of Conversation Districts and other agricultural commodity groups.  Back

 

Resolution No.  2008 - 5

CONFINED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFOS)

WHEREAS, Indiana has a land surface area of approximately 36,532 square miles and there are about 90,000 miles of rivers, streams, ditches, and drainage ways.

WHEREAS, many rivers, streams, ditches, and drainage ways originate in the state of Indiana containing much aquatic life, fish, and wildlife, and

WHEREAS, these natural resources provide recreation for many sportsmen and sportswomen as well as wildlife viewing opportunities for many more Hoosiers, and,

WHEREAS, these outdoor activities provides significant revenue for the state of Indiana through the sales of licenses and taxes on hunting and fishing equipment, travel, food and lodging, and,

WHEREAS, all of this economic activity provides much needed revenue to communities throughout Indiana.

WHEREAS, science has proven that the nutrients in manure from CAFO’S and CFO’S cause nutrient overload ( Eutrophication ) in rivers, streams, ditches, and drainage ways causing damage and kills to aquatic life, fish, and wildlife.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 7, 2008, at Brown County State Park, in Nashville, Indiana, supports a moratorium on CAFO’S and CFO’S in the state of Indiana.
 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Indiana Wildlife Federation encourages the State Legislature to look further into this issue and tighten regulations for CAFO’S and CFO’S based on Best Management Practices and concentrated numbers of facilities in various areas of  the state. Back

 

Resolution No.  2008 - 6

CONTINUING OUR SUPPORT FOR ADVANCING THE TECHNOLOGY OF INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE (IGCC).

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation (IWF) is committed to wisely using our country’s natural resources; and,

WHEREAS, IWF strongly supports energy alternatives such as wind and solar; and

WHEREAS, in spite of expanding the utilization of greener alternatives, coal fired generation will continue to be a major component of the global electrical generation mix for decades; and,

WHEREAS, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle has a much smaller environmental footprint than conventional coal plants; and,

WHEREAS, IGCC offers an opportunity to remove high levels of mercury prior to combustion; and,

WHEREAS, IGCC offers the potential for carbon capture and large scale geologic storage of carbon dioxide; and,

WHEREAS, IWF and the Clean Air Task Force have been extremely successful in negotiating an agreement that will result in a IGCC facility that can serve as a global model for others,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 7, 2008, at Brown County State Park, in Nashville, Indiana, continue its support of IGCC as a cleaner coal option for electric power generation. Back

Resolution No.  2008 - 7

Shooting Wildlife Enclosed by High Fences

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation has had a long organizational history of being dedicated to developing and promoting sound stewardship of wildlife resources and the environments upon which wildlife and humans depend; and,

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation subscribes to the Public Trust Doctrine which is the keystone component of fish and wildlife conservation in the United States which, in turn, holds that fish and wildlife resources are held in trust by the government for the benefit of the present and future generations of all citizens; and,

WHEREAS, the Indiana Wildlife Federation also subscribes to the North American Model of Fish and Wildlife Conservation which follows the following principles: (1) Wildlife as Public Trust Resources, (2) Elimination of Markets for Wildlife, (3) Allocation of Wildlife by Law, (4) Wildlife Can Only Be Killed for a Legitimate Purpose, (5) Wildlife are Considered an International Resource, (6) Science is the Proper Tool for Discharge of Wildlife Policy, and (7) Democracy of Hunting (i.e., equal access for all); and,

WHEREAS, the shooting of wildlife behind high fence enclosures that prevent their free movement does not conform to accepted ideas of fair chase; and,

WHEREAS, the shooting of wildlife behind high fence enclosures creates a negative public perception of hunting; and,

WHEREAS, importing wildlife species into, or maintaining artificially high populations of wildlife species within high fenced enclosures presents a disease threat to free-ranging wildlife and humans; and,

WHEREAS, enclosing free-ranging wildlife is in opposition to the long-held tenet that wildlife is a public resource;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Indiana Wildlife Federation, Inc., assembled in annual meeting on June 7, 2008, at Brown County State Park, in Nashville, Indiana, opposes shooting wildlife species enclosed by high fences. Back